Conclusions of the workshop

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During this Workshop, it was concluded that a Proton-Proton Collider with an energy of 100 TeV per beam and a luminosity of about 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible. The most important technical requirement for the realization of such a project is a large bending field. For instance, a field of 13 Tesla would be desirable. This is twice the field of the SSC superconducting magnets, which very likely may be achieved in a non-too-far future by extrapolation of the present technology. The design of this Collider would follow very closely the methods used for the design of ... continued below

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7 p.

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Ruggiero, A.G. December 31, 1996.

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During this Workshop, it was concluded that a Proton-Proton Collider with an energy of 100 TeV per beam and a luminosity of about 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible. The most important technical requirement for the realization of such a project is a large bending field. For instance, a field of 13 Tesla would be desirable. This is twice the field of the SSC superconducting magnets, which very likely may be achieved in a non-too-far future by extrapolation of the present technology. The design of this Collider would follow very closely the methods used for the design of the SSC and of the LHC, with the major noticeable difference that, because of the larger bending field and the larger beam energy, the performance is determined by the effects of the Synchrotron Radiation in the similar manner they affect the performance of an electron-positron collider. This fact has considerable beneficial consequences since it allows the attainment of large luminosity by reducing the beam dimensions at collision and by requiring, to some degree, less number of particles per beam. On the other end, the losses to synchrotron radiation are to be absorbed by the cryogenic system, and the vacuum system should be capable to cope with them. A more significant rf system may also be required. The cost is overwhelmingly important for a project of this size. It is possible to make an estimate of the cost of the collider alone, excluding the injector complex, by extrapolating from the experience acquired with the RHIC and SSC magnets. Thus, the cost estimate is more difficult, but it is not expected to exceed 10 billion dollars. This is only the technical cost of the components, to which other burden costs, of engineering, architectural and administrative nature, are to be added.

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7 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE99000430

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  • 34. workshop on hadron collider at the highest energy and luminosity, Erice (Italy), 4-13 Nov 1996

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  • Other: DE99000430
  • Report No.: BNL--65569
  • Report No.: CONF-9611138--
  • Grant Number: AC02-98CH10886
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 674831
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc703992

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  • December 31, 1996

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Nov. 6, 2015, 11:10 p.m.

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Ruggiero, A.G. Conclusions of the workshop, article, December 31, 1996; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc703992/: accessed August 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.