Etched silicon gratings for NGST

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The authors have developed the world's first etched silicon grisms at LLNL in September 1999. The high optical surface quality of the grisms allows diffraction-limited spectral resolution in the IR wavelengths where silicon has good transmission. They estimated that the scattering light level is less than 4% at 2.2 {micro}m. Silicon can significantly increase the dispersive power of spectroscopic instruments for NGST due to its very large refractive index (n = 3.4). For example, a silicon grism with 40 mm clear entrance aperture and a 46 wedge angle can provide R = 10,000--100,000 in {approximately} 1--10 {micro}m. The same grating ... continued below

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138 Kilobytes pages

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Ge, J.; Ciarlo, D.; Kuzmenko, P.; Macintosh, B.; Alcock, C. & Cook, K. October 28, 1999.

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Description

The authors have developed the world's first etched silicon grisms at LLNL in September 1999. The high optical surface quality of the grisms allows diffraction-limited spectral resolution in the IR wavelengths where silicon has good transmission. They estimated that the scattering light level is less than 4% at 2.2 {micro}m. Silicon can significantly increase the dispersive power of spectroscopic instruments for NGST due to its very large refractive index (n = 3.4). For example, a silicon grism with 40 mm clear entrance aperture and a 46 wedge angle can provide R = 10,000--100,000 in {approximately} 1--10 {micro}m. The same grating working in the immersed reflection mode can provide {approximately} three times higher spectral resolution than in the transmission mode. To achieve a desired spectral resolution for NGST, the spectrograph size and weight can be significantly reduced if silicon gratings are used instead of conventional gratings.

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138 Kilobytes pages

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  • Next Generation Space Telescope Science and Technology Exposition, Hyannis, MA (US), 09/13/1999--09/16/1999

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--135357
  • Report No.: YN0100000
  • Report No.: 99-FS-004
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 750369
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc703946

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  • October 28, 1999

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 2:26 p.m.

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Ge, J.; Ciarlo, D.; Kuzmenko, P.; Macintosh, B.; Alcock, C. & Cook, K. Etched silicon gratings for NGST, article, October 28, 1999; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc703946/: accessed August 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.