Corrosion detection in multi-layered rotocraft structures

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Description

Rotorcraft structures do not readily lend themselves to quantifiable inspection methods due to airframe construction techniques. Periodic visual inspections are a common practice for detecting corrosion. Unfortunately, when the telltale signs of corrosion appear visually, extensive repair or refurbishment is required. There is a need to nondestructively evaluate airframe structures in order to recognize and quantify corrosion before visual indications are present. Nondestructive evaluations of rotorcraft airframes face inherent problems different from those of the fixed wing industry. Most rotorcraft lap joints are very narrow, contain raised fastener heads, may possess distortion, and consist of thinner gage materials ({approximately}0.012--0.125 inches). ... continued below

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14 p.

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ROACH,DENNIS P.; WALKINGTON,PHILLIP D.; HOHMAN,ED & MARSHALL,GREG April 25, 2000.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

Rotorcraft structures do not readily lend themselves to quantifiable inspection methods due to airframe construction techniques. Periodic visual inspections are a common practice for detecting corrosion. Unfortunately, when the telltale signs of corrosion appear visually, extensive repair or refurbishment is required. There is a need to nondestructively evaluate airframe structures in order to recognize and quantify corrosion before visual indications are present. Nondestructive evaluations of rotorcraft airframes face inherent problems different from those of the fixed wing industry. Most rotorcraft lap joints are very narrow, contain raised fastener heads, may possess distortion, and consist of thinner gage materials ({approximately}0.012--0.125 inches). In addition the structures involve stack-ups of two and three layers of thin gage skins that are separated by sealant of varying thickness. Industry lacks the necessary data techniques, and experience to adequately perform routine corrosion inspection of rotorcraft. In order to address these problems, a program is currently underway to validate the use of eddy current inspection on specific rotorcraft lap joints. Probability of detection (POD) specimens have been produced that simulate two lap joint configurations on a model TH-57/206 helicopter. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center (AANC) at Sandia Labs and Bell Helicopter have applied single and dual frequency eddy current (EC) techniques to these test specimens. The test results showed enough promise to justify beta site testing of the eddy current methods evolved in this study. The technique allows users to distinguish between corrosion signals and those caused by varying gaps between the assembly of skins. Specific structural joints were defined as prime corrosion areas and a series of corrosion specimens were produced with 5--20% corrosion distributed among the layers of each joint. Complete helicopter test beds were used to validate the laboratory findings. This paper will present the laboratory and field results that quantify the EC technique's corrosion detection performance. Plans for beta site testing, adoption of the new inspection procedure into routine rotorcraft maintenance, and NDI training issues will also be discussed.

Physical Description

14 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00756089

Medium: P; Size: 14 pages

Source

  • DoD/FAA/NASA Conference on Aging Aircraft, St. Louis, MO (US), 05/15/2000--05/18/2000

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  • Report No.: SAND2000-1063C
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 756089
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc703563

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  • April 25, 2000

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • April 7, 2017, 2:06 p.m.

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ROACH,DENNIS P.; WALKINGTON,PHILLIP D.; HOHMAN,ED & MARSHALL,GREG. Corrosion detection in multi-layered rotocraft structures, article, April 25, 2000; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc703563/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.