Investigation of self-excited induction generators for wind turbine applications

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The use of squirrel-cage induction machines in wind generation is widely accepted as a generator of choice. The squirrel-cage induction machine is simple, reliable, cheap, lightweight, and requires very little maintenance. Generally, the induction generator is connected to the utility at constant frequency. With a constant frequency operation, the induction generator operates at practically constant speed (small range of slip). The wind turbine operates in optimum efficiency only within a small range of wind speed variation. The variable-speed operation allows an increase in energy captured and reduces both the torque peaks in the drive train and the power fluctuations sent ... continued below

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Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Sallan, J. & Sanz, M. February 28, 2000.

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The use of squirrel-cage induction machines in wind generation is widely accepted as a generator of choice. The squirrel-cage induction machine is simple, reliable, cheap, lightweight, and requires very little maintenance. Generally, the induction generator is connected to the utility at constant frequency. With a constant frequency operation, the induction generator operates at practically constant speed (small range of slip). The wind turbine operates in optimum efficiency only within a small range of wind speed variation. The variable-speed operation allows an increase in energy captured and reduces both the torque peaks in the drive train and the power fluctuations sent to the utility. In variable-speed operation, an induction generator needs an interface to convert the variable frequency output of the generator to the fixed frequency at the utility. This interface can be simplified by using a self-excited generator because a simple diode bridge is required to perform the ac/dc conversion. The subsequent dc/ac conversion can be performed using different techniques. The use of a thyristor bridge is readily available for large power conversion and has a lower cost and higher reliability. The firing angle of the inverter bridge can be controlled to track the optimum power curve of the wind turbine. With only diodes and thyristors used in power conversion, the system can be scaled up to a very high voltage and high power applications. This paper analyzes the operation of such a system applied to a 1/3-hp self-excited induction generator. It includes the simulations and tests performed for the different excitation configurations.

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  • 1999 IEEE Industry Applications Society Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ (US), 10/03/1999--10/07/1999

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  • Report No.: NREL/CP--500-26713
  • Grant Number: AC36-99GO10337
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 752407
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc703372

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • February 28, 2000

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • March 31, 2016, 8:12 p.m.

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Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Sallan, J. & Sanz, M. Investigation of self-excited induction generators for wind turbine applications, article, February 28, 2000; Golden, Colorado. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc703372/: accessed December 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.