Puerto Rico - 2002 : field studies to resolve aerosol processes.

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A number of questions remain concerning homogeneous aerosol formation by natural organics interacting with anthropogenic pollutants. For example, chlorine has been proposed as a potential oxidant in the troposphere because of its very high reactivity with a wide range of organics (Finlayson-Pitts, 1993). Indeed, sea salt aerosol in the presence of ozone has been shown to produce chlorine atoms in heterogeneous photochemical reactions under laboratory conditions. Whether chlorine can initiate oxidation of natural organics such as monoterpene hydrocarbons and can generate homogeneous nucleation or condensable material that contributes to aerosol loadings needs to be assessed. The nighttime reactions of ozone ... continued below

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8 p.

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Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A. & Ravelo, R. October 5, 1999.

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A number of questions remain concerning homogeneous aerosol formation by natural organics interacting with anthropogenic pollutants. For example, chlorine has been proposed as a potential oxidant in the troposphere because of its very high reactivity with a wide range of organics (Finlayson-Pitts, 1993). Indeed, sea salt aerosol in the presence of ozone has been shown to produce chlorine atoms in heterogeneous photochemical reactions under laboratory conditions. Whether chlorine can initiate oxidation of natural organics such as monoterpene hydrocarbons and can generate homogeneous nucleation or condensable material that contributes to aerosol loadings needs to be assessed. The nighttime reactions of ozone and nitrate radical can also result in monoterpene reactions that contribute to aerosol mass. We are currently planning field studies in Puerto Rico to assess these aerosol issues and other atmospheric chemistry questions. Puerto Rico has a number of key features that make it very attractive for a field study of this sort. The principal feature is the island's very regular meteorology and its position in the Caribbean Sea relative to the easterly trade winds. This meteorology and the island's rectangular shape (100 x 35 miles) make it highly suitable for simplification of boundary layer conditions. In addition, the long stretch between Puerto Rico and the nearest pollution sources in Africa and southern Europe make the incoming background air relatively clean and constant. Furthermore, Puerto Rico has approximately 3.5 million people with a very well defined source region and a central area of rain forest vegetation. These features make Puerto Rico an ideal locale for assessing aerosol processes. The following sections describe specific areas of atmospheric chemistry that can be explored during the proposed field study.

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8 p.

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OSTI as DE00750463

Medium: P; Size: 8 pages

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  • Symposium on Atmospheric Chemistry Issues in the 21st Century, Long Beach, CA (US), 01/09/2000--01/14/2000

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  • Report No.: ANL/ER/CP-99194
  • Grant Number: W-31-109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 750463
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc702935

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  • October 5, 1999

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • April 11, 2017, 6:12 p.m.

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Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A. & Ravelo, R. Puerto Rico - 2002 : field studies to resolve aerosol processes., article, October 5, 1999; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc702935/: accessed June 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.