Enhanced supercurrents above 100 K in mercury cuprates via fission of mercury

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Large-scale technological success of high-temperature superconductors will ultimately be decided by their capacity to sustain large critical current densities J{sub c} in high magnetic fields. There are two principal factors controlling current conduction. One is regions of weaker superconductivity (weak links) at the grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. Another is easy motion of magnetic vortices in the bulk -- the result being energy dissipation and losses. Each of these factors is a challenge to overcome, for their origin is intrinsic: i.e. short superconducting coherence length {xi}, large anisotropy, large thermal fluctuations (related to high transition temperature T{sub c}), and perhaps ... continued below

Physical Description

12 p.

Creation Information

Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Petrov, D.K.; Lopez, D.; Thompson, J.R.; Wheeler, W.; Ullmann, J. et al. May 1, 1998.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Large-scale technological success of high-temperature superconductors will ultimately be decided by their capacity to sustain large critical current densities J{sub c} in high magnetic fields. There are two principal factors controlling current conduction. One is regions of weaker superconductivity (weak links) at the grain boundaries in polycrystalline materials. Another is easy motion of magnetic vortices in the bulk -- the result being energy dissipation and losses. Each of these factors is a challenge to overcome, for their origin is intrinsic: i.e. short superconducting coherence length {xi}, large anisotropy, large thermal fluctuations (related to high transition temperature T{sub c}), and perhaps even a d-wave character of the superconducting ground state. For these reasons, in spite of the highest T{sub c}`s (> 130 K), mercury cuprates HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub n{minus}1}Cu{sub n}O{sub 2n+2+{delta}} with n = 1, 2 or 3 adjacent CuO layers (Hg-1201, 01212, or -1223) still have relatively low-lying irreversibility lines (suppressed by a strong 2-D nature of the vortex structure), above which J{sub c} vanishes. Here, the authors demonstrate a method by which they expand the useful range to T > 100 K (higher than in Y-, Bi-, or Tl-based materials) and boost J{sub c} by orders of magnitude in fields of several Tesla -- namely fission of Hg nuclei within Hg-cuprates with energetic (0.8 GeV) protons. This technologically viable process allows doping these cuprates with strongly pinning columnar defects.

Physical Description

12 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE98005582

Source

  • 8. US/Japan workshop on high temperature superconductivity, Tallahassee, FL (United States), 8-10 Dec 1997

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE98005582
  • Report No.: ORNL/CP--98138
  • Report No.: CONF-971227--
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 672052
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc702348

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • May 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Nov. 3, 2016, 7:02 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 2

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Petrov, D.K.; Lopez, D.; Thompson, J.R.; Wheeler, W.; Ullmann, J. et al. Enhanced supercurrents above 100 K in mercury cuprates via fission of mercury, article, May 1, 1998; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc702348/: accessed December 13, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.