Solids Control in Sludge Pretreatment

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Sludge pretreatment will likely involve washing, followed by caustic or acidic leaching and washing of sludge residues after leaching. The principal goal of pretreatment is to obtain a low-volume high-activity waste stream and a high-volume low-activity waste stream. Also, some waste constituents such as chromium and phosphate can be included in glass formulations only at very low concentrations; therefore, it is desirable to remove them from high-level waste streams. Two aspects of sludge treatment and subsequent separations should be well delineated and predictable: (1) the distribution of chemical species between aqueous solutions and solids and (2) potential problems due to ... continued below

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14 p.

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Beahm, E.C., Weber, C.F., Hunt, R.D., Dillow, T.A. December 31, 1997.

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Sludge pretreatment will likely involve washing, followed by caustic or acidic leaching and washing of sludge residues after leaching. The principal goal of pretreatment is to obtain a low-volume high-activity waste stream and a high-volume low-activity waste stream. Also, some waste constituents such as chromium and phosphate can be included in glass formulations only at very low concentrations; therefore, it is desirable to remove them from high-level waste streams. Two aspects of sludge treatment and subsequent separations should be well delineated and predictable: (1) the distribution of chemical species between aqueous solutions and solids and (2) potential problems due to chemical interactions that could result in process difficulties or safety concerns.Before any treatment technology is adopted, it must be demonstrated that the process can be carried out as planned. Three pretreatment methods were considered in the Tri-Party (Washington State Ecology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Energy) negotiations: (1) sludge washing with corrosion- inhibiting water, (2) Enhanced Sludge Washing, and (3)acidic dissolution with separations processes. Enhanced Sludge Washing is the baseline process. In Enhanced Sludge Washing, sludge is first washed with corrosion-inhibiting water; it is then leached with caustic (sodium hydroxide solution) and washed again with corrosion- inhibiting water. The initial concern is whether a pretreatment technique is effective in separating sludge components. This can be evaluated by bench-scale tests with sludge specimens from underground storage tanks. The results give data on the distribution of important species such as aluminum, phosphate, and radionuclides between wash and leach solutions and solid sludge residues.

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14 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE98000120

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  • 214. American Chemical Society meeting, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 7-13 Sep 1997

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  • Other: DE98000120
  • Report No.: CONF-970962--3
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 621545
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc697067

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  • December 31, 1997

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • June 13, 2016, 8:57 p.m.

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Beahm, E.C., Weber, C.F., Hunt, R.D., Dillow, T.A. Solids Control in Sludge Pretreatment, article, December 31, 1997; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc697067/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.