Nitrogen Deposition: A Component of Global Change Analyses

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The global cycles of carbon and nitrogen are being perturbed by human activities that increase the transfer from large pools of nonreactive forms of the elements to reactive forms that are essential to the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere. The cycles are closely linked at all scales, and global change analyses must consider carbon and nitrogen cycles together. The increasing amount of nitrogen originating from fossil fuel combustion and deposited to terrestrial ecosystems as nitrogen oxides could increase the capacity of ecosystems to sequester carbon thereby removing some of the excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and slowing the development ... continued below

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37 p.

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Norby, Richard J. December 31, 1997.

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Description

The global cycles of carbon and nitrogen are being perturbed by human activities that increase the transfer from large pools of nonreactive forms of the elements to reactive forms that are essential to the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere. The cycles are closely linked at all scales, and global change analyses must consider carbon and nitrogen cycles together. The increasing amount of nitrogen originating from fossil fuel combustion and deposited to terrestrial ecosystems as nitrogen oxides could increase the capacity of ecosystems to sequester carbon thereby removing some of the excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and slowing the development of greenhouse warming. Several global and ecosystem models have calculated the amount of carbon sequestration that can be attributed to nitrogen deposition based on assumptions about the allocation of nitrogen among ecosystem components with different carbon-nitrogen ratios. They support the premise that nitrogen deposition is responsible for a an increasing terrestrial carbon sink since industrialization began, but there are large uncertainties related to the continued capacity of ecosystems to retain exogenous nitrogen. Whether terrestrial ecosystems continue to sequester additional carbon will depend in part on their response to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, which is widely thought to be constrained by limited nitrogen availability. Ecosystem models generally support the conclusion that the responses of ecosystems to increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide will be larger, and the range of possible responses will be wider, in ecosystems with increased nitrogen inputs originating as atmospheric deposition.

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37 p.

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OSTI as DE98001912

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  • 3. new phytologist symposium, Lancaster (United Kingdom), 3-5 Sep 1997

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  • Other: DE98001912
  • Report No.: ORNL/CP--95601
  • Report No.: CONF-9709184--
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 629304
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc696869

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • December 31, 1997

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • Jan. 25, 2016, 6:47 p.m.

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Norby, Richard J. Nitrogen Deposition: A Component of Global Change Analyses, article, December 31, 1997; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc696869/: accessed December 10, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.