Biophysical and biological factors determining the ability to achieve long-term cryobiological preservation

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The BESTCapsule will maintain appropriate biological specimens for decades or centuries at cryogenic temperatures in the living state. Maintenance at temperatures below {approximately} {minus}140 C is not a problem. No ordinary chemical reactions in aqueous solutions can occur. The only source of damage will be the slow accumulation of physical damage to DNA from background ionizing radiation. But this source of damage should not become serious in less than a millennium. Rather, the main problem in cryopreservation is to devise procedures for cooling the biological specimens to {minus}196 C and returning them to normal temperatures without inflicting lethal injury. Regardless ... continued below

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8 p.

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Mazur, P. December 1, 1997.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Mazur, P. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Life Sciences Div.

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Description

The BESTCapsule will maintain appropriate biological specimens for decades or centuries at cryogenic temperatures in the living state. Maintenance at temperatures below {approximately} {minus}140 C is not a problem. No ordinary chemical reactions in aqueous solutions can occur. The only source of damage will be the slow accumulation of physical damage to DNA from background ionizing radiation. But this source of damage should not become serious in less than a millennium. Rather, the main problem in cryopreservation is to devise procedures for cooling the biological specimens to {minus}196 C and returning them to normal temperatures without inflicting lethal injury. Regardless of the cell type, there are certain encompassing biophysical factors and constraints that determine whether they will survive or die during freezing and thawing. Superimposed on these may be special biological factors that apply to specific cell types. This paper will emphasize the former and give illustrative examples of the latter.

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8 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE98001256

Source

  • BESTCapsule 2001 workshop, Osaka (Japan), 2-6 Nov 1997

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  • Other: DE98001256
  • Report No.: ORNL/CP--95102
  • Report No.: CONF-971178--
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 554808
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc696846

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  • December 1, 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • Aug. 25, 2016, 2:37 p.m.

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Mazur, P. Biophysical and biological factors determining the ability to achieve long-term cryobiological preservation, article, December 1, 1997; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc696846/: accessed August 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.