Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

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Description

Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination ... continued below

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15 p.

Creation Information

Burlage, R.S.; Youngblood, T. & Lamothe, D. April 1, 1998.

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This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 44 times . More information about this report can be viewed below.

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  • Burlage, R.S. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
  • Youngblood, T. Frisby Technologies, Aiken, SC (United States)
  • Lamothe, D. American Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States). Ordnance/Explosives Environmental Services Div.

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Description

Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

Physical Description

15 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE98003374

Source

  • Minwara conference, Monterey, CA (United States), 5-9 Apr 1998

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  • Other: DE98003374
  • Report No.: ORNL/CP--96972
  • Report No.: CONF-980425--
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • DOI: 10.2172/645466 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 645466
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc694859

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Creation Date

  • April 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 21, 2016, 10:14 p.m.

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Burlage, R.S.; Youngblood, T. & Lamothe, D. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection, report, April 1, 1998; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc694859/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.