Using Phytoremediation to Clean Up Contamination at Military Installations

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During and following World War II, wastes from the production of munitions and other military materials were disposed of using the best available practices acceptable at that time. However, these disposal methods often contaminated soil and groundwater with organic compounds and metals that require cleanup under current regulations. An emerging technology for cleaning contaminated soils and shallow groundwater is phytoremediation, an environmentally friendly, low- cost, and low-tech process. Phytoremediation encompasses all plant- influenced biological, chemical, and physical processes that aid in the uptake, degradation, and metabolism of contaminants by either plants or free-living organisms in the plant`s rhizosphere. A phytoremediation ... continued below

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19 p.

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Zellmer, S.D.; Hinchman, R.R.; Negri, M.C.; Schneider, J.F. & Gatliff, E.G. July 1, 1997.

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Description

During and following World War II, wastes from the production of munitions and other military materials were disposed of using the best available practices acceptable at that time. However, these disposal methods often contaminated soil and groundwater with organic compounds and metals that require cleanup under current regulations. An emerging technology for cleaning contaminated soils and shallow groundwater is phytoremediation, an environmentally friendly, low- cost, and low-tech process. Phytoremediation encompasses all plant- influenced biological, chemical, and physical processes that aid in the uptake, degradation, and metabolism of contaminants by either plants or free-living organisms in the plant`s rhizosphere. A phytoremediation system can be viewed as a biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system) that enhances the soil and below-ground ecosystem for subsequent productive use. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been conducting basic and applied research in phytoremediation since 1990. Initial greenhouse studies evaluated salt-tolerant wetland plants to clean UP and reduce the volume of salty `produced water` from petroleum wells. Results of these studies were used to design a bioreactor for processing produced water that is being demonstrated at a natural gas well in Oklahoma; this system can reduce produced water volume by about 75% in less than eight days, representing substantial savings in waste disposal cost. During 1994, ANL conducted a TNT plant uptake and in situ remediation study in a ridge-and-furrow area used for the disposal of pink water at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant.

Physical Description

19 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE97007971

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  • 2. Tri-service environmental technology workshop, St. Louis, MO (United States), 10-12 Jun 1997

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  • Other: DE97007971
  • Report No.: ANL/ES/CP--94040
  • Report No.: CONF-9706183--
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 621000
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc694609

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  • July 1, 1997

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • Sept. 1, 2016, 1:32 p.m.

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Zellmer, S.D.; Hinchman, R.R.; Negri, M.C.; Schneider, J.F. & Gatliff, E.G. Using Phytoremediation to Clean Up Contamination at Military Installations, article, July 1, 1997; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc694609/: accessed August 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.