Problem free nuclear power and global change

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Nuclear fission power reactors represent a solution-in-principle to all aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high- grade heat for electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-driving around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates. However, a substantial number of major issues currently stand between nuclear power implemented with light- water reactors and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems, including long-term fuel supply, adverse public perceptions regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel ... continued below

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10 p.

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Teller, E.; Wood, L.; Nuckolls, J.; Ishikawa, M. & Hyde, R. August 15, 1997.

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Description

Nuclear fission power reactors represent a solution-in-principle to all aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high- grade heat for electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-driving around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates. However, a substantial number of major issues currently stand between nuclear power implemented with light- water reactors and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems, including long-term fuel supply, adverse public perceptions regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps more seriously - cost. We describe a GW-scale, high-temperature nuclear reactor heat source that can operate with no human intervention for a few decades and that may be widely acceptable, since its safety features are simple, inexpensive and easily understood. We provide first-level details of a reactor system designed to satisfy these requirements. Such a back-solving approach to realizing large-scale nuclear fission power systems potentially leads to an energy source capable of meeting all large-scale stationary demands for high- temperature heat. If widely employed to support such demands, it could, for example, directly reduce present-day world-wide CO{sub 2} emissions by two-fold; by using it to produce non-carbonaceous fuels for small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction could be attained. Even the first such reduction would permit continued slow power-demand growth in the First World and rapid development of the Third World, both without any governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage.

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10 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE98050748

Other: FDE: PDF; PL:

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  • 22. international symposium on planetary emergencies, Erice (Italy), 23 Aug 1997

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  • Other: DE98050748
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--128716
  • Report No.: CONF-9708117--
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 614877
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc694237

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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  • August 15, 1997

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • April 6, 2017, 6:27 p.m.

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Teller, E.; Wood, L.; Nuckolls, J.; Ishikawa, M. & Hyde, R. Problem free nuclear power and global change, article, August 15, 1997; California. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc694237/: accessed April 18, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.