Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

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The characteristics of entrained particles generated by advanced coal conversion technologies and the harsh flue gas environments from which these particles must be removed challenge current ceramic barrier filtration systems. Measurements have shown that the size distribution, morphology, and chemical composition of particles generated by pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and gasification processes differ significantly from the corresponding characteristics of conventional pulverized-coal ash particles. The entrained particulate matter from these advanced conversion technologies often comprise fine size distributions, irregular particle morphologies, high specific surface areas, and significant proportions of added sorbent material. These characteristics can create high ash cohesivity and high ... continued below

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15 p.

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Potius, D. & Snyder, T. July 1, 1997.

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The characteristics of entrained particles generated by advanced coal conversion technologies and the harsh flue gas environments from which these particles must be removed challenge current ceramic barrier filtration systems. Measurements have shown that the size distribution, morphology, and chemical composition of particles generated by pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and gasification processes differ significantly from the corresponding characteristics of conventional pulverized-coal ash particles. The entrained particulate matter from these advanced conversion technologies often comprise fine size distributions, irregular particle morphologies, high specific surface areas, and significant proportions of added sorbent material. These characteristics can create high ash cohesivity and high pressure losses through the filter cakes. In addition, the distributions of chemical constituents among the collected particles provide local, highly concentrated chemical species that promote reactions between adjacent particles that ultimately cause strong, nodular deposits to form in the filter vessel. These deposits can lead directly to bridging and filter element failure. This project is designed to address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic filter elements. The activities conducted under Task 1, Assessment of Ash Characteristics, are discussed in this paper. Activities conducted under Task 2, Testing and Failure Analysis of Ceramic Filters, are discussed in a separate paper included in the proceedings of the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems `97 Conference. The specific objectives of Task I include the generation of a data base of the key characteristics of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and the identification of relationships between HGCU ash properties and the operation and performance of APFS. During the past year, particulate samples have been characterized from the DOE/FETC Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR), the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC), the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), and gasification studies conducted by Herman Research Pty. Ltd. (HRL) of Melbourne, Australia. This paper discusses these analyses and also presents a coherent mechanism describing how and why consolidated ash deposits form in PFBC filter vessels. This description is based on site observations made at the Tidd PFBC, field and laboratory analyses of ashes and nodules collected from Grimethorpe, Tidd and Karhula, and a review of literature describing eutectic formation, sintering, and consolidation of boiler tube deposits.

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15 p.

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OSTI as DE98051667

Other: FDE: PDF; PL:

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  • Advanced coal-based power and environmental systems `97 conference, Pittsburgh, PA (United States), 22-24 Jul 1997

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  • Other: DE98051667
  • Report No.: DOE/MC/31160--98/C0933
  • Report No.: CONF-970772--
  • Grant Number: AC21-94MC31160
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 620963
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc693886

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  • July 1, 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • April 10, 2017, 1:45 p.m.

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Potius, D. & Snyder, T. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues, article, July 1, 1997; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc693886/: accessed August 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.