Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 2, September 1994--August 1996

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One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options (others are depleted oil and gas wells or deep, confined aquifers) and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Technically, the term `disposal` is really a misnomer because the atmosphere and ocean eventually equilibrate on a time ... continued below

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324 p.

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Herzog, H. J. & Adams, E. E. December 1996.

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Description

One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options (others are depleted oil and gas wells or deep, confined aquifers) and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Technically, the term `disposal` is really a misnomer because the atmosphere and ocean eventually equilibrate on a time scale of 1000 years regardless of where the CO{sub 2} is originally discharged. However, peak atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations expected to occur in the next few centuries could be significantly reduced by ocean disposal. The magnitude of this reduction will depend upon the quantity of CO{sub 2} injected in the ocean, as well as the depth and location of injection. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release.

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324 p.

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OSTI as DE97054033

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  • Other Information: PBD: Dec 1996

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  • Other: DE97054033
  • Report No.: DOE/PC/94227--T10-Vol.2
  • Grant Number: FG22-94PC94227
  • DOI: 10.2172/570123 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 570123
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc693709

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  • December 1996

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • Nov. 10, 2015, 8:55 p.m.

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Herzog, H. J. & Adams, E. E. Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 2, September 1994--August 1996, report, December 1996; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc693709/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.