The Stanford Linear Collider

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The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e{sup {minus}}) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z{sup 0} boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source ... continued below

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5 p.

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Emma, P. June 1, 1995.

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Description

The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e{sup {minus}}) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z{sup 0} boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed.

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5 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE95012519

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  • 16. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) particle accelerator conference, Dallas, TX (United States), 1-5 May 1995

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  • Other: DE95012519
  • Report No.: SLAC-PUB--95-6866
  • Report No.: CONF-950512--82
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00515
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 64177
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc693368

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  • June 1, 1995

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • Feb. 2, 2016, 6:08 p.m.

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Emma, P. The Stanford Linear Collider, article, June 1, 1995; Menlo Park, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc693368/: accessed August 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.