Immobilization of degradative bacteria in polyurethane-based foams: embedding efficiency and effect on bacterial activity

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The immobilization of TCE-degrading bacterium Burkholderia cepacia was evaluated using hydrophilic polyurethane foam. The influence of several foam formulation parameters upon cell retention was examined. Surfactant type was a major determinant of retention, with a lecithin- based compound retaining more cells than pluronic or silicone based surfactants. Excessive amounts of surfactant led to increased washout of bacteria. Increasing the biomass concentration from 4.8% to 10.5% caused fewer cells to be washed out. Embedding at reduced temperature did not significantly affect retention, while the use of a silane binding agent gave inconsistent results. The optimal formulation retained all but 0.2% of ... continued below

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21 p.

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Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.; Hazen, T.C. & Hermann, P. September 3, 1996.

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Description

The immobilization of TCE-degrading bacterium Burkholderia cepacia was evaluated using hydrophilic polyurethane foam. The influence of several foam formulation parameters upon cell retention was examined. Surfactant type was a major determinant of retention, with a lecithin- based compound retaining more cells than pluronic or silicone based surfactants. Excessive amounts of surfactant led to increased washout of bacteria. Increasing the biomass concentration from 4.8% to 10.5% caused fewer cells to be washed out. Embedding at reduced temperature did not significantly affect retention, while the use of a silane binding agent gave inconsistent results. The optimal formulation retained all but 0.2% of total embedded cells during passage of 2 liters of water through columns containing 2 g of foam. All foam formulations tested reduced the culturability of embedded cells by several orders of magnitude. However, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} evolution rates of embedded cells were never less than 50% of unembedded cells. Nutrient amendments stimulated an increase in cell volume and ribosomal activity as indicated by hybridization studies using fluorescently labeled ribosomal probes. these results indicated that, although immobilized cells were nonculturable, they were metabolically active and thus could be used for biodegradation of toxic compounds.

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21 p.

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OSTI as DE97053859

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  • Other Information: PBD: 3 Sep 1996

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  • Other: DE97053859
  • Report No.: WSRC-MS--96-0470
  • Grant Number: AC09-89SR18035
  • DOI: 10.2172/565240 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 565240
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc693105

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  • September 3, 1996

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • Feb. 9, 2016, 8:51 p.m.

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Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.; Hazen, T.C. & Hermann, P. Immobilization of degradative bacteria in polyurethane-based foams: embedding efficiency and effect on bacterial activity, report, September 3, 1996; Aiken, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc693105/: accessed January 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.