Properties of near-net shape metallic components made by the directed light fabrication process

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Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) is a process invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory that can be used to fuse any metal powder directly to a fully dense, near-net shape component with full structural integrity. A solid model design of a desired component is first developed on a computer work station. A motion path, produced from the solid model definition, is translated to actual machine commands through a post-processor, specific to the deposition equipment. The DLF process uses a multi-axis positioning system to move the laser focal zone over the part cross section defined by the part boundaries and desired layer ... continued below

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10 p.

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Lewis, G. K.; Milewski, J. O.; Thoma, D. B. & Nemec, R. B. October 1, 1997.

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Description

Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) is a process invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory that can be used to fuse any metal powder directly to a fully dense, near-net shape component with full structural integrity. A solid model design of a desired component is first developed on a computer work station. A motion path, produced from the solid model definition, is translated to actual machine commands through a post-processor, specific to the deposition equipment. The DLF process uses a multi-axis positioning system to move the laser focal zone over the part cross section defined by the part boundaries and desired layer thickness. Metal powders, delivered in an argon stream, enter the focal zone where they melt and continuously form a molten pool of material that moves with the laser focal spot. Position and movement of the spot is controlled through the post-processor. Successive cross-sectional layers are added by advancing the spot one layer thickness beyond the previous layer until the entire part is deposited. The system has 4 powder feeders attached for co-deposition of multiple materials to create alloys at the focal zone or form dissimilar metal joint combinations by changing powder composition from one material to another. Parts produced by the DLF process vary in complexity from simple bulk solid forms to detailed components fabricated from difficult to process metals and alloys. Parts have been deposited at rates up to 33 cm{sup 3}/hr with 12 cm{sup 3}/hr more typical. Feasibility of processing any metal ranging in melting point from aluminium to tungsten has been demonstrated. Mechanical properties for bulk DLF deposits of three alloy powders were measured for this study. Ti-6Al-4V and 316 stainless steel powders were fabricated into rectangular bar, and Inconel 690 powder was fabricated into a solid cylinder.

Physical Description

10 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00539837

Medium: P; Size: 10 pages

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  • 8. solid freeform fabrication conference, Austin, TX (US), 08/11/1997--08/13/1997; Other Information: Supercedes report DE98000262; PBD: 1997

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  • Other: DE98000262
  • Report No.: LA-UR--97-3450
  • Report No.: CONF-970888--
  • Report No.: ON: DE98000262
  • Grant Number: AC12-76SN00052
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 539837
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc692916

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • October 1, 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • April 6, 2017, 6:53 p.m.

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Lewis, G. K.; Milewski, J. O.; Thoma, D. B. & Nemec, R. B. Properties of near-net shape metallic components made by the directed light fabrication process, article, October 1, 1997; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692916/: accessed June 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.