Task 6.3 -- Engineering performance of advanced structural materials. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

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SiC sublimes without melting at temperatures over 2,000 C. This makes SiC difficult to use in the fabrication of large structures, because pieces made from SiC cannot be joined together in the same way that metals can be welded. Therefore, the size of the monolithic ceramic structures that can be manufactured are limited by the size of the sintering furnaces (approximately 10 feet for sintered alpha silicon carbide). In order to make larger objects such as heat exchangers, many small ceramic pieces must be fused or joined. In addition, repair of the objects will require the use of field joining ... continued below

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12 p.

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Hurley, J.P.; Kay, J.; Nowok, J.W. & Schuster, M. August 1, 1997.

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Description

SiC sublimes without melting at temperatures over 2,000 C. This makes SiC difficult to use in the fabrication of large structures, because pieces made from SiC cannot be joined together in the same way that metals can be welded. Therefore, the size of the monolithic ceramic structures that can be manufactured are limited by the size of the sintering furnaces (approximately 10 feet for sintered alpha silicon carbide). In order to make larger objects such as heat exchangers, many small ceramic pieces must be fused or joined. In addition, repair of the objects will require the use of field joining techniques. At present, no joining techniques for high-temperature structural ceramics are routinely available. The objective of this work at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to develop a patentable technique for joining large silicon based advanced ceramics in the field. The key to developing a successful technique will be the use of reactive joining compounds to lower the joining temperature but without leaving continuous channels of unreacted compounds that can weaken the joint or be conduits for corrosion at temperatures over 1,400 C. Special efforts will be made in this project to transfer the developed technologies to the materials industry via licensing agreements through the EERC Foundation.

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12 p.

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OSTI as DE97002255

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  • Other Information: PBD: Aug 1997

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  • Other: DE97002255
  • Report No.: DOE/MC/30097--5608
  • Grant Number: FC21-93MC30097
  • DOI: 10.2172/634161 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 634161
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc692499

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  • August 1, 1997

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • May 2, 2016, 1:37 p.m.

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Hurley, J.P.; Kay, J.; Nowok, J.W. & Schuster, M. Task 6.3 -- Engineering performance of advanced structural materials. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995, report, August 1, 1997; Grand Forks, North Dakota. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692499/: accessed September 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.