Literature review: Phytoaccumulation of chromium, uranium, and plutonium in plant systems

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Phytoremediation is an integrated multidisciplinary approach to the cleanup of contaminated soils, which combines the disciplines of plant physiology, soil chemistry, and soil microbiology. Metal hyperaccumulator plants are attracting increasing attention because of their potential application in decontamination of metal-polluted soils. Traditional engineering technologies may be too expensive for the remediation of most sites. Removal of metals from these soils using accumulator plants is the goal of phytoremediation. The emphasis of this review has been placed on chromium (Cr), plutonium (Pu), and uranium (U). With the exception of Cr, these metals and their decay products exhibit two problems, specifically, radiation ... continued below

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53 p.

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Hossner, L.R.; Loeppert, R.H.; Newton, R.J. & Szaniszlo, P.J. May 1, 1998.

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Description

Phytoremediation is an integrated multidisciplinary approach to the cleanup of contaminated soils, which combines the disciplines of plant physiology, soil chemistry, and soil microbiology. Metal hyperaccumulator plants are attracting increasing attention because of their potential application in decontamination of metal-polluted soils. Traditional engineering technologies may be too expensive for the remediation of most sites. Removal of metals from these soils using accumulator plants is the goal of phytoremediation. The emphasis of this review has been placed on chromium (Cr), plutonium (Pu), and uranium (U). With the exception of Cr, these metals and their decay products exhibit two problems, specifically, radiation dose hazards and their chemical toxicity. The radiation hazard introduces the need for special precautions in reclamation beyond that associated with non-radioactive metals. The uptake of beneficial metals by plants occurs predominantly by way of channels, pores, and transporters in the root plasma membrane. Plants characteristically exhibit a remarkable capacity to absorb what they need and exclude what they don`t need. But most vascular plants absorb toxic and heavy metals through their roots to some extent, though to varying degrees, from negligible to substantial. Sometimes absorption occurs because of the chemical similarity between beneficial and toxic metals. Some plants utilize exclusion mechanisms, where there is a reduced uptake by the roots or a restricted transport of the metal from root to shoot. At the other extreme, hyperaccumulator plants absorb and concentrate metals in both roots and shoots. Some plant species endemic to metalliferous soils accumulate metals in percent concentrations in the leaf dry matter.

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53 p.

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OSTI as DE98005257

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  • Other Information: PBD: May 1998

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  • Other: DE98005257
  • Report No.: ANRCP--1998-3
  • Grant Number: FC04-95AL85832
  • DOI: 10.2172/604402 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 604402
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc692326

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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  • May 1, 1998

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • Jan. 22, 2018, 12:25 p.m.

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Hossner, L.R.; Loeppert, R.H.; Newton, R.J. & Szaniszlo, P.J. Literature review: Phytoaccumulation of chromium, uranium, and plutonium in plant systems, report, May 1, 1998; [Amarillo,] Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692326/: accessed April 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.