Thermal modeling of waste cylinders in a large container

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The Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Engineering Laboratory, INEEL, is to produce a spent fuel waste product which is essentially a heat-generating ceramic cylinder with a very tight-fitting stainless steel clad. The size of this waste product, which is under development, is such that many of them will fit into one of the large cylindrical containers being considered for use at the Yucca Mountain repository in Nevada. A key concern is how to size the waste cylinders and arrange them inside the container so that the space within the container is efficiently used and ceramic ... continued below

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6 p.

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Feldman, E.E. October 1, 1997.

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Description

The Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Engineering Laboratory, INEEL, is to produce a spent fuel waste product which is essentially a heat-generating ceramic cylinder with a very tight-fitting stainless steel clad. The size of this waste product, which is under development, is such that many of them will fit into one of the large cylindrical containers being considered for use at the Yucca Mountain repository in Nevada. A key concern is how to size the waste cylinders and arrange them inside the container so that the space within the container is efficiently used and ceramic temperatures above about 600 C are not reached. The waste cylinders are all the same size and are uniformly arranged in layers on a triangular pitch. A layer is formed by placing a number of waste cylinders together and orienting them as if they were cans sitting on a shelf. Here the shelf is a flat circular surface whose diameter is that of the inside of the container, 1.481 m (58.3 in). Many parallel shelves, or layers, of cylinders are placed one above the next inside the container. Three packaging concepts were considered for a layer: (1) the cylinders are separated only by open spaces, (2) a metallic, high thermal conductivity matrix is used which has holes (on a triangular pitch) in which the cylinders are centered, and (3) each cylinder is centered in a hexagonal-shaped tube and the tubes are placed side by side to form a large hexagon which fits inside the large container. All three concepts are thermally acceptable. For Concept 1 the temperatures are somewhat insensitive to the choice of fill gas, loose packing is preferable, and 3, 19, and 91 cylinders provide similar good results.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE98050374

Source

  • 1998 international high-level radioactive waste management conference, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 11-14 May 1998

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  • Other: DE98050374
  • Report No.: ANL/RA/CP--94745
  • Report No.: CONF-980516--
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 645513
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc692056

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • October 1, 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • May 16, 2016, 6:08 p.m.

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Feldman, E.E. Thermal modeling of waste cylinders in a large container, article, October 1, 1997; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc692056/: accessed December 10, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.