Threshold velocity for environmentally-assisted cracking in low alloy steels

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Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels is generally believed to be activated by dissolution of MnS inclusions at the crack tip in high temperature LWR environments. EAC is the increase of fatigue crack growth rate of up to 40 to 100 times the rate in air that occurs in high temperature LWR environments. A steady state theory developed by Combrade, suggested that EAC will initiate only above a critical crack velocity and cease below this same velocity. A range of about twenty in critical crack tip velocities was invoked by Combrade, et al., to describe data available at ... continued below

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11 p.

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Wire, G.L. & Kandra, J.T. April 1, 1997.

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Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels is generally believed to be activated by dissolution of MnS inclusions at the crack tip in high temperature LWR environments. EAC is the increase of fatigue crack growth rate of up to 40 to 100 times the rate in air that occurs in high temperature LWR environments. A steady state theory developed by Combrade, suggested that EAC will initiate only above a critical crack velocity and cease below this same velocity. A range of about twenty in critical crack tip velocities was invoked by Combrade, et al., to describe data available at that time. This range was attributed to exposure of additional sulfides above and below the crack plane. However, direct measurements of exposed sulfide densities on cracked specimens were performed herein and the results rule out significant additional sulfide exposure as a plausible explanation. Alternatively, it is proposed herein that localized EAC starting at large sulfide clusters reduces the calculated threshold velocity from the value predicted for a uniform distribution of sulfides. Calculations are compared with experimental results where the threshold velocity has been measured, and the predicted wide range of threshold values for steels of similar sulfur content but varying sulfide morphology is observed. The threshold velocity decreases with the increasing maximum sulfide particle size, qualitatively consistent with the theory. The calculation provides a basis for a conservative minimum velocity threshold tied directly to the steel sulfur level, in cases where no details of sulfide distribution are known.

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11 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE97003903

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  • 8. international symposium on environmental degradation of materials in nuclear power systems-water reactors, Amelia Island, FL (United States), 10-14 Aug 1997

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  • Other: DE97003903
  • Report No.: WAPD-T--3131
  • Report No.: CONF-970832--2
  • Grant Number: AC11-93PN38195
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 501535
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc691917

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • April 1, 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • May 16, 2016, 6:08 p.m.

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Wire, G.L. & Kandra, J.T. Threshold velocity for environmentally-assisted cracking in low alloy steels, article, April 1, 1997; Aiken, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc691917/: accessed December 13, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.