Synergy of seismic, acoustic, and video signals in blast analysis

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The range of mining applications from hard rock quarrying to coal exposure to mineral recovery leads to a great variety of blasting practices. A common characteristic of many of the sources is that they are detonated at or near the earth`s surface and thus can be recorded by camera or video. Although the primary interest is in the seismic waveforms that these blasts generate, the visual observations of the blasts provide important constraints that can be applied to the physical interpretation of the seismic source function. In particular, high speed images can provide information on detonation times of individuals charges, ... continued below

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16 p.

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Anderson, D.P.; Stump, B.W. & Weigand, J. September 1, 1997.

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The range of mining applications from hard rock quarrying to coal exposure to mineral recovery leads to a great variety of blasting practices. A common characteristic of many of the sources is that they are detonated at or near the earth`s surface and thus can be recorded by camera or video. Although the primary interest is in the seismic waveforms that these blasts generate, the visual observations of the blasts provide important constraints that can be applied to the physical interpretation of the seismic source function. In particular, high speed images can provide information on detonation times of individuals charges, the timing and amount of mass movement during the blasting process and, in some instances, evidence of wave propagation away from the source. All of these characteristics can be valuable in interpreting the equivalent seismic source function for a set of mine explosions and quantifying the relative importance of the different processes. This paper documents work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Southern Methodist University to take standard Hi-8 video of mine blasts, recover digital images from them, and combine them with ground motion records for interpretation. The steps in the data acquisition, processing, display, and interpretation are outlined. The authors conclude that the combination of video with seismic and acoustic signals can be a powerful diagnostic tool for the study of blasting techniques and seismology. A low cost system for generating similar diagnostics using consumer-grade video camera and direct-to-disk video hardware is proposed. Application is to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

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16 p.

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OSTI as DE97008811

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  • High tech blasting seminar, Orlando, FL (United States), 28 Jul - 1 Aug 1997

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  • Other: DE97008811
  • Report No.: LA-UR--97-2139
  • Report No.: CONF-970779--2
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 527421
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc691279

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • September 1, 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • June 24, 2016, 10:01 p.m.

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Anderson, D.P.; Stump, B.W. & Weigand, J. Synergy of seismic, acoustic, and video signals in blast analysis, article, September 1, 1997; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc691279/: accessed October 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.