Synchro-ballistic recording of detonation phenomena

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Synchro-ballistic use of rotating-mirror streak cameras allows for detailed recording of high-speed events of known velocity and direction. After an introduction to the synchro-ballistic technique, this paper details two diverse applications of the technique as applied in the field of high-explosives research. In the first series of experiments detonation-front shape is recorded as the arriving detonation shock wave tilts an obliquely mounted mirror, causing reflected light to be deflected from the imaging lens. These tests were conducted for the purpose of calibrating and confirming the asymptotic Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory of Bdzil and Stewart. The phase velocities of the ... continued below

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9 p.

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Critchfield, R.R.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.; Davis, W.C.; Ferm, E.N. & Idar, D.J. September 1, 1997.

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Synchro-ballistic use of rotating-mirror streak cameras allows for detailed recording of high-speed events of known velocity and direction. After an introduction to the synchro-ballistic technique, this paper details two diverse applications of the technique as applied in the field of high-explosives research. In the first series of experiments detonation-front shape is recorded as the arriving detonation shock wave tilts an obliquely mounted mirror, causing reflected light to be deflected from the imaging lens. These tests were conducted for the purpose of calibrating and confirming the asymptotic Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) theory of Bdzil and Stewart. The phase velocities of the events range from ten to thirty millimeters per microsecond. Optical magnification is set for optimal use of the film`s spatial dimension and the phase velocity is adjusted to provide synchronization at the camera`s maximum writing speed. Initial calibration of the technique is undertaken using a cylindrical HE geometry over a range of charge diameters and of sufficient length-to-diameter ratio to insure a stable detonation wave. The final experiment utilizes an arc-shaped explosive charge, resulting in an asymmetric detonation-front record. The second series of experiments consists of photographing a shaped-charge jet having a velocity range of two to nine millimeters per microsecond. To accommodate the range of velocities it is necessary to fire several tests, each synchronized to a different section of the jet. The experimental apparatus consists of a vacuum chamber to preclude atmospheric ablation of the jet tip with shocked-argon back lighting to produce a shadow-graph image.

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9 p.

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OSTI as DE97009107

Medium: P; Size: 9 p.

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  • Annual meeting of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, San Diego, CA (United States), 27 Jul - 1 Aug 1997

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  • Other: DE97009107
  • Report No.: LA-UR--97-2384
  • Report No.: CONF-970706--7
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 532579
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc690865

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  • September 1, 1997

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • April 13, 2017, 2:57 p.m.

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Critchfield, R.R.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.; Davis, W.C.; Ferm, E.N. & Idar, D.J. Synchro-ballistic recording of detonation phenomena, article, September 1, 1997; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc690865/: accessed September 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.