Final report pulsed plasma processing of effluent pollutants and hazardous chemicals

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Description

The electrical discharge techniques, called non-thermal, utilize high voltage breakdown of gases using short pulses of one to a few hundred nanoseconds. These short pulses between metal electrodes generate energetic electrons without appreciable thermal heating of the gas. The energetic electrons collide with gas molecules to form radicals. The radicals then react with pollutants to form harmless compounds. Our non-thermal experimental device used a wire in a pipe geometry. The wire was driven by a 40 kilovolt pulse 100 nanoseconds long. Gas was circulated in a loop through the pipe geometry in a closed system. This system permitted the introduction ... continued below

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14 p.

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Vogtlin, G.; Bardsley, N.; Penetrante, B. & Warman, H. August 18, 1994.

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Description

The electrical discharge techniques, called non-thermal, utilize high voltage breakdown of gases using short pulses of one to a few hundred nanoseconds. These short pulses between metal electrodes generate energetic electrons without appreciable thermal heating of the gas. The energetic electrons collide with gas molecules to form radicals. The radicals then react with pollutants to form harmless compounds. Our non-thermal experimental device used a wire in a pipe geometry. The wire was driven by a 40 kilovolt pulse 100 nanoseconds long. Gas was circulated in a loop through the pipe geometry in a closed system. This system permitted the introduction of various gas combinations prior to testing. The recirculated gas was heated to determine the effect on the electrical discharge, and chemical reactions. Additives were introduced to improve the efficiency (defined as energy input per unit molecule destroyed). The efficient was found to be the most important parameter in that the experiments generally required high energy inputs. However, we were able to significantly improve the efficiency of NO removal by the addition of hydrocarbons, nitric oxide has been removed with an energy cost of 15 ev per NO molecule. We believe the hydrocarbon additive serves by recycling the hydroxyl radicals during the oxidation of NO. The implementation of this process will depend largely on how much additives, electrical power consumption, and final NO{sub x} concentration are acceptable for a particular application.

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14 p.

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OSTI as DE98051055

Other: FDE: PDF; PL:

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  • Other Information: PBD: 18 Aug 1994

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  • Other: DE98051055
  • Report No.: UCRL-ID--118321
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/620595 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 620595
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc689911

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • August 18, 1994

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  • Aug. 14, 2015, 8:43 a.m.

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  • April 10, 2017, 1:39 p.m.

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Vogtlin, G.; Bardsley, N.; Penetrante, B. & Warman, H. Final report pulsed plasma processing of effluent pollutants and hazardous chemicals, report, August 18, 1994; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc689911/: accessed November 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.