Progress on binding CO{sub 2} in mineral substrates

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Based on current estimates of reserves, coal could satisfy even a very much increased world energy demand for centuries, if only the emission of CO{sub 2} disposal that is based on combining CO{sub 2} chemically with abundant raw materials to form stable carbonate minerals. A major advantage of this method is that the resulting waste product is thermodynamically stable and environmentally neutral. It is therefore possible to store large quantities permanently with minimal environmental impact and without the danger of an accidental release of CO{sub 2} which has proven fatal in quantities far smaller than contemplated here. The raw materials ... continued below

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12 p.

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Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P. & Wendt, C.H. October 1, 1996.

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Based on current estimates of reserves, coal could satisfy even a very much increased world energy demand for centuries, if only the emission of CO{sub 2} disposal that is based on combining CO{sub 2} chemically with abundant raw materials to form stable carbonate minerals. A major advantage of this method is that the resulting waste product is thermodynamically stable and environmentally neutral. It is therefore possible to store large quantities permanently with minimal environmental impact and without the danger of an accidental release of CO{sub 2} which has proven fatal in quantities far smaller than contemplated here. The raw materials to bind CO{sub 2} exist in nature in large quantities. They are readily accessible and far exceed what would be required to bind all CO{sub 2} that could possibly be generated by burning the entire fossil fuel reserves. In this paper the authors outline a specific process that they are currently investigating. The initial rough cost estimate of about 3{cents}/kWh is encouraging. The availability of a CO{sub 2} fixation technology would serve as insurance in case global warming, or the perception of global warming, would cause severe restrictions on CO{sub 2} emissions. If the increased energy demand of a growing world population is to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of such a technology would be unavoidable.

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12 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96014656

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  • 3. international conference on carbon dioxide removal, Cambridge, MA (United States), 9-11 Sep 1996

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  • Other: DE96014656
  • Report No.: LA-UR--96-2818
  • Report No.: CONF-9609102--2
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 383563
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc688336

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  • October 1, 1996

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 26, 2016, 3:33 p.m.

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Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P. & Wendt, C.H. Progress on binding CO{sub 2} in mineral substrates, article, October 1, 1996; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc688336/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.