Moldable Transient Suppression Polymer Composite

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The objective of the CRADA was to cooperate in the development of a moldable transient suppression polymer composite that can be used to protect electrical equipment and electronics from damage caused by electrical disturbances and faults. The composite was to provide a solid- state means of fault current limitation, particularly for high-current applications. The composite was envisioned to have the following properties: (1) be moldable and therefore suited to the automated manufacture at a low cost; (2) operate with greater speed and reliability than electromechanical devices; and (3) operate in conjunction with appropriately designated mechanical breakers to limit the current ... continued below

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Campbell, v.b. & modine, f.a. November 24, 1998.

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Description

The objective of the CRADA was to cooperate in the development of a moldable transient suppression polymer composite that can be used to protect electrical equipment and electronics from damage caused by electrical disturbances and faults. The composite was to provide a solid- state means of fault current limitation, particularly for high-current applications. The composite was envisioned to have the following properties: (1) be moldable and therefore suited to the automated manufacture at a low cost; (2) operate with greater speed and reliability than electromechanical devices; and (3) operate in conjunction with appropriately designated mechanical breakers to limit the current and energy under short-circuit fault conditions, thereby providing improved protection to equipment connected to the circuit. The technical work of the project was in part shared between Lockheed Martin and the General Electric Company and in part divided between the participants according to their capabilities. Work was performed in the Oak Ridge K-25, Y-12, and X-10 facilities of Lockheed Martin and at the General Electric Company Corporate Research and Development (GE-CR&D) and Electrical Distribution and Control (GE-ED&C) facilities. Materials were fabricated in facilities of the Y-12 Development. Department, where polymers were filled with varying amounts of conductive materials. However, as the effort was reduced because of curtailed DOE funding, GE took over fabrication of filled epoxies and then assumed responsibility for all materials fabrication. Electrical testing and theoretical modeling by Lockheed-Martin were performed at X-10, excepting that some pulse testing of materials and the development of specialized pulse test apparatus was done at the K-25 site. GE shared in low-power electrical testing at CR&D and pefiormed high-power electrical testing using specialized facilities at the ED&C. GE took responsibility for setting the performance requirements of the materials for their product applications. Other phases of the project such as product integration, breaker design, manufacturing, and marketing were considered solely the responsibilities of GE. Similarly, the tooling required for manufacture was a responsibility of the General Electric Company. The objectives of the CRADA had not been met when it was terminated by the DOE, but much progress had been made toward the project goals. A large variety of composites was fabricated by filling various polymers with conductors or semiconductors, and electrical testing was used to identify the promising materials. Theoretical analyses were performed to gain better understanding of some of the associated electrical phenomena. The progress toward the goals of the CRADA proved sufficient for the General Electric Company to continue to develop the materials without a DOE sponsored partner.

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  • Other: DE00004285
  • Report No.: Y/AMT-619
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • DOI: 10.2172/4285 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 4285
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc688284

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  • November 24, 1998

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 11:21 p.m.

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Campbell, v.b. & modine, f.a. Moldable Transient Suppression Polymer Composite, report, November 24, 1998; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc688284/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.