Final Report Full-Scale Test of DWPF Advanced Liquid-Level and Density Measurement Bubblers

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As requested by the Technical Task Request (1), a full-scale test was carried out on several different liquid-level measurement bubblers as recommended from previous testing (2). This final report incorporates photographic evidence (Appendix B) of the bubblers at different stages of testing, along with the preliminary results (Appendix C) which were previously reported (3), and instrument calibration data (Appendix D); while this report contains more detailed information than previously reported (3) the conclusions remain the same. The test was performed under highly prototypic conditions from November 26, 1996 to January 23, 1997 using the full-scale SRAT/SME tank test facilities located ... continued below

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84 p.

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Duignan, M.R. & Weeks, G.E. July 1, 1999.

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Description

As requested by the Technical Task Request (1), a full-scale test was carried out on several different liquid-level measurement bubblers as recommended from previous testing (2). This final report incorporates photographic evidence (Appendix B) of the bubblers at different stages of testing, along with the preliminary results (Appendix C) which were previously reported (3), and instrument calibration data (Appendix D); while this report contains more detailed information than previously reported (3) the conclusions remain the same. The test was performed under highly prototypic conditions from November 26, 1996 to January 23, 1997 using the full-scale SRAT/SME tank test facilities located in the 672-T building at TNX. Two different types of advanced bubblers were subjected to approximately 58 days of slurry operation; 14 days of which the slurry was brought to boiling temperatures.The test showed that the large diameter tube bubbler (2.64 inches inside diameter) operated successfully throughout the2-month test by not plugging with the glass-frit ladened slurry which was maintained at a minimum temperature of 50 deg Cand several days of boiling temperatures. However, a weekly blow-down with air or water is recommended to minimize the slurry which builds up.The small diameter porous tube bubbler (0.62 inch inside diameter; water flow {gt} 4 milliliters/hour = 1.5 gallons/day) operated successfully on a daily basis in the glass-frit ladened slurry which was maintained at a minimum temperature of 50 degrees C and several days of boiling temperatures. However, a daily blow-down with air, or air and water, is necessary to maintain accurate readings.For the small diameter porous tube bubbler (0.62 inch inside diameter; water flow {gt} 4 milliliters/hour = 1.5 gallons/day) there were varying levels of success with the lower water-flow tubes and these tubes would have to be cleaned by blowing with air, or air and water, several times a day to maintain them plug free. This may be too labor intensive for practical use.All of the large diameter bubbler tubes tested could be readily cleaned in place by either blowing them down with justhigh pressure air or water (approx. 90 psig). While the use of both air and water produced the cleanest bubbler, using justair removed most of the slurry build-up, and the use of water resulted in basically a slurry free surface. For the smalldiameter bubbler tubes it was necessary to use high pressure air and water (approx. 90 psig) to effectively clean them. The water was only sent through the porous jacket and not introduced down the air line. However, even under these conditions there was one case where a plug was not removed when both air and water were used.Primary recommendation: The large diameter probe is the best choice since none of the three tested plugged during the2-mouth test period to the point which compromised liquid-level measure. However, after a week`s operation at boilingtemperatures several inches of a soft sludge builds up within the tubes. This sludge can be easily removed in place witheither high pressure air or water (approx. 90 psig). A full-scale verifi-cation test should be carried out in S-area to confirm the conclusion.Secondary recommendation: The small-diameter porous tube bubbler is recommended when an access port cannot accommodate thelarger diameter probe. Bubbler {number_sign}1 operated accurately during most of the test period. This probe had the highest water flowrate (approx. 1.6 gallons/day) and had the least distance from the slurry upper surface (37 inches). This probe can be made to accurately operate at lower depths if the 8-inch-long porous tube is made longer and the water flow rate made higher.Substituting the current level and density probes (Holledge) with bubbler probes will result in a significant cost savings (inexpensive materials, less labor to manufacture, less labor to maintain, less down time due to less frequent instrument replacement).

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84 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE98059071

Source

  • ASME Fluids Engineering Division summer meeting, San Francisco, CA (United States), 18-23 Jul 1999

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  • Other: DE98059071
  • Report No.: WSRC-TR--97-0103
  • Report No.: CONF-990702--
  • Grant Number: AC09-96SR18500
  • DOI: 10.2172/350786 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 350786
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc687584

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  • July 1, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 10, 2016, 2:38 p.m.

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Duignan, M.R. & Weeks, G.E. Final Report Full-Scale Test of DWPF Advanced Liquid-Level and Density Measurement Bubblers, report, July 1, 1999; Aiken, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc687584/: accessed December 12, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.