PINEX: The pinhole neutron experiment

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The pinhole neutron experiment is sometimes called ``Pinex``, a name which has also been used to describe the pin method of measuring the time required for imploding metals to travel to certain locations in space. The two experiments are not related and should not be confused with each other. The pinhole neutron experiment is very similar to the optical pinhole camera in which light passing through a pinhole in an opaque screen produces an inverted image of the source. In the pinhole neutron experiment 14 Mev neutrons from a thermonuclear device travel in straight.lines from their respective points of origin ... continued below

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10 p.

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Sartain, C.C. November 21, 1958.

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Description

The pinhole neutron experiment is sometimes called ``Pinex``, a name which has also been used to describe the pin method of measuring the time required for imploding metals to travel to certain locations in space. The two experiments are not related and should not be confused with each other. The pinhole neutron experiment is very similar to the optical pinhole camera in which light passing through a pinhole in an opaque screen produces an inverted image of the source. In the pinhole neutron experiment 14 Mev neutrons from a thermonuclear device travel in straight.lines from their respective points of origin outward in all directions. Those which pass through a pinhole in an opaque neutron shield make an inverted neutron image of the source. Some of the neutrons which form the image are captured by threshold detector plates which have been suitably located behind the pinhole. Neutrons that have sufficient energy react with the nuclei of the detector plate to form radioactive nuclei that by their decay locate the position of the image on the plate. The image may be made visible by autoradiography or counting techniques. In the autoradiograph, an x-ray film is placed in contact with the image plate. As the radioactive nuclei decay, they expose the film. The image is visible when the film has been adequately exposed and developed. In the counting method, the image plate is cut into small pieces; each the size of a resolution element. Each piece is separately counted. The number of neutrons causing its radioactivity is determined and plotted on a drawing of the plate. These numbers indicate the shape of the D-T plasma at the time of ``burn``. It is the object of this paper to discuss the factors affecting the various parameters in the experiment and what information is required to optimize these parameters for a given set of conditions. Formulae are written in many alternative ways to emphasize the effect to be expected from a change in any one of the many parameters.

Physical Description

10 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE97050850

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  • Other Information: PBD: 21 Nov 1958

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  • Other: DE97050850
  • Report No.: UCRL-ID--124986
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/423587 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 423587
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc685106

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • November 21, 1958

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 19, 2016, 8:35 p.m.

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Sartain, C.C. PINEX: The pinhole neutron experiment, report, November 21, 1958; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc685106/: accessed October 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.