Surface Engineering of Silicon and Carbon by Pulsed-Laser Ablation

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Experiments are described in which a focused pulsed-excimer laser beam is used either to ablate a graphite target and deposit hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films, or to directly texture a silicon surface and produce arrays of high-aspect-ratio silicon microcolumns. In the first case, diamond-like carbon (or tetrahedral amorphous carbon, ta-C) films were deposited with the experimental conditions selected so that the masses and kinetic energies of incident carbon species were reasonably well controlled. Striking systematic changes in ta-C film properties were found. The sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon fraction, the valence electron density, and the optical (Tauc) energy gap ail reach their maximum ... continued below

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14 p.

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Fowlkes, J.D.; Geohegan, D.B.; Jellison, G.E., Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Merkulov, V.I.; Pedraza, A.J. et al. February 28, 1999.

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Experiments are described in which a focused pulsed-excimer laser beam is used either to ablate a graphite target and deposit hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films, or to directly texture a silicon surface and produce arrays of high-aspect-ratio silicon microcolumns. In the first case, diamond-like carbon (or tetrahedral amorphous carbon, ta-C) films were deposited with the experimental conditions selected so that the masses and kinetic energies of incident carbon species were reasonably well controlled. Striking systematic changes in ta-C film properties were found. The sp{sup 3}-bonded carbon fraction, the valence electron density, and the optical (Tauc) energy gap ail reach their maximum values in films deposited at a carbon ion kinetic energy of {approximately}90 eV. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements also reveal that films deposited at 90 eV are extremely smooth (rms roughness {approximately}1 {angstrom} over several hundred nm) and relatively free of particulate, while the surface roughness increases in films deposited at significantly lower energies. In the second set of experiments, dense arrays of high-aspect-ratio silicon microcolumns {approximately}20-40 {micro}m tall and {approximately}2 {micro}m in diameter were formed by cumulative nanosecond pulsed excimer laser irradiation of silicon wafers in air and other oxygen-containing atmospheres. It is proposed that microcolumn growth occurs through a combination of pulsed-laser melting of the tips of the columns and preferential redeposition of silicon on the molten tips from the ablated flux of silicon-rich vapor. The common theme in this research is that a focused pulsed-laser beam can be used quite generally to create an energetic flux, either the energetic carbon ions needed to form sp{sup 3} (diamond-like) bonds or the overpressure of silicon-rich species needed for microcolumn growth. Thus, new materials synthesis opportunities result from the access to nonequilibrium growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

Physical Description

14 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00003663

Medium: P; Size: 14 pages

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  • Annual Meeting of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, San Diego, CA (US), 02/28/1999--03/04/1999

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  • Report No.: ORNL/CP-101232
  • Report No.: KC 02 02 02 0
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 3663
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc685049

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  • February 28, 1999

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • April 7, 2017, 2:32 p.m.

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Fowlkes, J.D.; Geohegan, D.B.; Jellison, G.E., Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Merkulov, V.I.; Pedraza, A.J. et al. Surface Engineering of Silicon and Carbon by Pulsed-Laser Ablation, article, February 28, 1999; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc685049/: accessed September 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.