Frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this paper, the authors present the results of the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal is to present possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in ... continued below

Physical Description

12 p.

Creation Information

Erteza, I.A.; Craft, D.C.; Stalker, K.T.; Taylor, E.W.; Kelley, M.A.; Sanchez, A.D. et al. December 31, 1994.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Authors

Publisher

  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this paper, the authors present the results of the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal is to present possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in this paper was designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and performed by SNL and Phillips Laboratory (PL) personnel at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). In the experiment, a TeO{sub 2} slow shear-wave acousto-optic cell was exposed to radiation from the WSMR linear accelerator. The TeO{sub 2} cell was placed in an experimental configuration which allowed swept frequency diffracted power measurements to be taken during radiation exposure and recovery. A series of exposures was performed. Each exposure consisted of between 1 to 800, 1 {mu}sec radiation pulses (yielding exposures of 2.25 kRad(Si) to 913 kRad(Si)), followed by recovery time. At low total and cumulative doses, the bandshape of the frequency response (i.e. diffracted power vs. frequency) remained almost identical during and after radiation. At the higher exposures, however, the amplitude and width of the frequency response changed as the radiation continued, but returned to the original shape slowly after the radiation stopped and recovery proceeded. It is interesting to note that the location of the Bragg degeneracy does not change significantly with radiation. In this paper, the authors discuss these effects, and they discuss the effect on the signal processing functionality.

Physical Description

12 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE95009588

Source

  • SPIE international symposium on aerospace/defense sensing and dual-use photonics, Orlando, FL (United States), 17-21 Apr 1995

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE95009588
  • Report No.: SAND--94-2519C
  • Report No.: CONF-950472--5
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/46707 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 46707
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc684245

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • December 31, 1994

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:21 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • June 27, 2016, 12:54 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 7

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Erteza, I.A.; Craft, D.C.; Stalker, K.T.; Taylor, E.W.; Kelley, M.A.; Sanchez, A.D. et al. Frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation, report, December 31, 1994; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc684245/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.