Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation

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Description

A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore ... continued below

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4 p.

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Schauer, D.A. & Perfect, S.A. March 1, 1996.

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Description

A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore no active change in limb stiffness. The approach recognized that the most important contributions of the muscles to the lower extremity response are their ability to define and modify the impedance of the limb. When nonlinear material behavior in a component of the leg model was deemed important to response, a nonlinear constitutive model was incorporated. The accuracy of these assumptions can be verified only through a review of analysis results and careful comparison with test data. As currently defined, the model meets the objective for which it was created. Much work remains to be done, both from modeling and analysis perspectives, before the model can be considered complete. The model implements a modeling philosophy that can accurately capture both kinematic and kinetic response of the lower limb. We have demonstrated that the lower extremity model is a valuable tool for understanding the injury processes and mechanisms. We are now in a position to extend the computer simulation to investigate the clinical fracture patterns observed in actual crashes. Additional experience with this model will enable us to make a statement on what measures are needed to significantly reduce lower extremity injuries in vehicle crashes. 6 refs.

Physical Description

4 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96009089

Source

  • 1996 international mechanical engineering congress and exhibition, Atlanta, GA (United States), 17-22 Nov 1996

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  • Other: DE96009089
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--123414
  • Report No.: CONF-961105--1
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 393294
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc683741

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  • March 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 19, 2016, 11:08 a.m.

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Schauer, D.A. & Perfect, S.A. Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation, article, March 1, 1996; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc683741/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.