BNL-AGS complex as a spallation target test-bed

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The Brookhaven National Laboratory-Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (BNL-AGS) accelerates protons for high energy physics experiments up to a maximum energy of 24 GeV. The BNL-AGS complex consists of a LINAC (200 MeV), which feeds into a Booster synchrotron (1.5 GeV), and finally the main AGS ring (24 GeV). The Booster has a quarter of the AGS circumference, and thus four Booster pulses can be stacked into the AGS for acceleration up to the maximum desired energy In principle, the AGS can deliver protons to multiple targets in a single or multiple pulses over an energy range of 1.5- 24 GeV. Fig ... continued below

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4 p.

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Ludewig, H.; Axe, J.; Hastings, J.; Roser, T.; Todosow, M. & Schaeffer, M. October 1, 1996.

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The Brookhaven National Laboratory-Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (BNL-AGS) accelerates protons for high energy physics experiments up to a maximum energy of 24 GeV. The BNL-AGS complex consists of a LINAC (200 MeV), which feeds into a Booster synchrotron (1.5 GeV), and finally the main AGS ring (24 GeV). The Booster has a quarter of the AGS circumference, and thus four Booster pulses can be stacked into the AGS for acceleration up to the maximum desired energy In principle, the AGS can deliver protons to multiple targets in a single or multiple pulses over an energy range of 1.5- 24 GeV. Fig 1 shows the history of the AGS intensity improvements, indicating the major upgrades. It can be seen that a major improvement was introduced when the Booster was brought on line, since the space charge limit is reduced at this energy, allowing for the dramatic increase in intensity. The peak intensity of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse represents a world record for a proton synchrotron. The next generation short-pulse spallation neutron source (SNS) as currently planned will operate with an average proton power of 1-5 MW, and a repetition rate of 2-50 Hz. The required proton pulses will be 1-10 {mu}s long, implying approximately I 00 KJ per pulse. Plans for such sources are being formulated in Japan, Europe, and the United States. The combination of a short pulse and the large amount of energy per pulse implies the creation of thermo-mechanical enhanced thermal stresses in the target which could lead to catastrophic target failure. In order to validate the mechanical integrity and neutronic performance of these new target designs it will be necessary to carry out a series of experiments using proton pulses which have prototypic pulse lengths and energy content per pulse. In addition, the pre-moderator, moderator, and reflector arrangement needs to be optimized for the new operating conditions.

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4 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE96015064

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  • Symposium on the Savannah River Accelerator project and complementary spallation neutron sources, Columbia, SC (United States), 14-15 May 1996

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  • Other: DE96015064
  • Report No.: BNL-NUREG--63379
  • Report No.: CONF-9605223--2
  • Grant Number: AC02-76CH00016
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 392663
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc682674

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  • October 1, 1996

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Dec. 4, 2015, 10:26 p.m.

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Ludewig, H.; Axe, J.; Hastings, J.; Roser, T.; Todosow, M. & Schaeffer, M. BNL-AGS complex as a spallation target test-bed, article, October 1, 1996; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc682674/: accessed July 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.