Advanced manufacturing by spray forming: Aluminum strip and microelectromechanical systems

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Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. INEL is developing a unique spray-forming method based on de Laval (converging/diverging) nozzle designs to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Properties of the spray-formed material are tailored by controlling the characteristics of the spray plume and substrate. Two examples are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and ... continued below

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10 p.

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McHugh, K.M. December 31, 1994.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 12 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. INEL is developing a unique spray-forming method based on de Laval (converging/diverging) nozzle designs to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Properties of the spray-formed material are tailored by controlling the characteristics of the spray plume and substrate. Two examples are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the replication of micron-scale features in micropatterned polymers during the production of microelectromechanical systems.

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10 p.

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OSTI as DE95008615

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  • Technology 2004, Washington, DC (United States), 8-10 Nov 1994

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  • Other: DE95008615
  • Report No.: EGG-M--94157
  • Report No.: CONF-9411151--3
  • Grant Number: AC07-94ID13223
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 32648
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc681986

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  • December 31, 1994

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 24, 2016, 7:01 p.m.

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McHugh, K.M. Advanced manufacturing by spray forming: Aluminum strip and microelectromechanical systems, article, December 31, 1994; Idaho Falls, Idaho. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc681986/: accessed September 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.