High speed imaging of Raleigh-Taylor instabilities in laser driven plates

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Recent improvements and modifications of the imaging techniques have identified and provided measurements of Raleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities that occur in these events. The microscope system in the LLNL Micro Detonics Facility, was converted to an epi-illuminated polarization configuration. A double pulse nanosecond illuminator and a second independently focusable frame camera were also added to the system. A laser driven plate, that is a dense solid driven by a laser heated, lower density plasma, is inherently R-T unstable. The plates are aluminum, deposited on the ends of optical fibers. They are launched by a YAG Laser pulse traveling down the fiber. ... continued below

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12 p.

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Frank, A.M.; Gillespie, C.H. & Trott, W.M. October 1, 1996.

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Recent improvements and modifications of the imaging techniques have identified and provided measurements of Raleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities that occur in these events. The microscope system in the LLNL Micro Detonics Facility, was converted to an epi-illuminated polarization configuration. A double pulse nanosecond illuminator and a second independently focusable frame camera were also added to the system. A laser driven plate, that is a dense solid driven by a laser heated, lower density plasma, is inherently R-T unstable. The plates are aluminum, deposited on the ends of optical fibers. They are launched by a YAG Laser pulse traveling down the fiber. Plate velocities are several kilometers per second and characteristic dimensions of the instabilities are a few to tens of microns. Several techniques were used to examine the plates, the most successful being specularly reflecting polarization microscopy looking directly at the plate as it flies toward the camera. These images gave data on the spatial frequencies of the instabilities but could not give the amplitudes. To measure the amplitude of the instability a semi- transparent witness plate was placed a known distance from the plate. As above, the plate was observed using the polarization microscope but using the streak camera as the detector. Both the launch of the plate and its impact into the witness plate are observed on the streak record. Knowing the plate velocity function from earlier velocimetry measurements and observing the variations in the arrival time across the plate, the amplitude of the instability can be calculated.

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12 p.

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OSTI as DE97051647

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  • 22. international congress on high speed photography and photonics, Santa Fe, NM (United States), 28 Oct 1996

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  • Other: DE97051647
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--123824
  • Report No.: CONF-9610181--13
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48;AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 479059
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc681719

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  • October 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:21 a.m.

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  • Feb. 18, 2016, 5:27 p.m.

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Frank, A.M.; Gillespie, C.H. & Trott, W.M. High speed imaging of Raleigh-Taylor instabilities in laser driven plates, article, October 1, 1996; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc681719/: accessed July 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.