A Field Evaluation of Airborne Techniques for Detection of Unexploded Ordnance

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US Defense Department estimates indicate that as many as 11 million acres of government land in the U. S. may contain unexploded ordnance (UXO), with the cost of identifying and disposing of this material estimated at nearly $500 billion. The size and character of the ordnance, types of interference, vegetation, geology, and topography vary from site to site. Because of size or composition, some ordnance is difficult to detect with any geophysical method, even under favorable soil and cultural interference conditions. For some sites, airborne methods may provide the most time and cost effective means for detection of UXO. Airborne ... continued below

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9 p.

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Bell, D.; Doll, W.E.; Hamlett, P.; Holladay, J.S.; Nyquist, J.E.; Smyre, J. et al. March 14, 1999.

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US Defense Department estimates indicate that as many as 11 million acres of government land in the U. S. may contain unexploded ordnance (UXO), with the cost of identifying and disposing of this material estimated at nearly $500 billion. The size and character of the ordnance, types of interference, vegetation, geology, and topography vary from site to site. Because of size or composition, some ordnance is difficult to detect with any geophysical method, even under favorable soil and cultural interference conditions. For some sites, airborne methods may provide the most time and cost effective means for detection of UXO. Airborne methods offer lower risk to field crews from proximity to unstable ordnance, and less disturbance of sites that maybe environmentally sensitive. Data were acquired over a test site at Edwards AFB, CA using airborne magnetic, electromagnetic, multispectral and thermal sensors. Survey areas included sites where trenches might occur, and a test site in which we placed deactivated ordnance, ranging in size from small ''bomblets'' to large bombs. Magnetic data were then acquired with the Aerodat HM-3 system, which consists of three cesium magnetometers within booms extending to the front and sides of the helicopter, and mounted such that the helicopter can be flown within 3m of the surface. Electromagnetic data were acquired with an Aerodat 5 frequency coplanar induction system deployed as a sling load from a helicopter, with a sensor altitude of 15m. Surface data, acquired at selected sites, provide a comparison with airborne data. Multispectral and thermal data were acquired with a Daedelus AADS 1268 system. Preliminary analysis of the test data demonstrate the value of airborne systems for UXO detection and provide insight into improvements that might make the systems even more effective.

Physical Description

9 p.

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OSTI as DE00003914

Medium: P; Size: 9 pages

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  • Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Environmental and Engineering Problems, Oakland, CA (US), 03/14/1999--03/18/1999

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  • Report No.: ORNL/CP-101923
  • Report No.: 47 WE 06 66 4
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 3914
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc680937

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • March 14, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • April 11, 2017, 8:15 p.m.

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Bell, D.; Doll, W.E.; Hamlett, P.; Holladay, J.S.; Nyquist, J.E.; Smyre, J. et al. A Field Evaluation of Airborne Techniques for Detection of Unexploded Ordnance, article, March 14, 1999; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc680937/: accessed April 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.