Energy storage for hybrid remote power systems

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Energy storage can be a cost-effective component of hybrid remote power systems. Storage serves the special role of taking advantage of intermittent renewable power sources. Traditionally this role has been played by lead-acid batteries, which have high life-cycle costs and pose special disposal problems. Hydrogen or zinc-air storage technologies can reduce life-cycle costs and environmental impacts. Using projected data for advanced energy storage technologies, LLNL ran an optimization for a hypothetical Arctic community with a reasonable wind resource (average wind speed 8 m/s). These simulations showed the life-cycle annualized cost of the total energy system (electric plus space heating) might ... continued below

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11 p.

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Isherwood, W. March 1, 1998.

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Energy storage can be a cost-effective component of hybrid remote power systems. Storage serves the special role of taking advantage of intermittent renewable power sources. Traditionally this role has been played by lead-acid batteries, which have high life-cycle costs and pose special disposal problems. Hydrogen or zinc-air storage technologies can reduce life-cycle costs and environmental impacts. Using projected data for advanced energy storage technologies, LLNL ran an optimization for a hypothetical Arctic community with a reasonable wind resource (average wind speed 8 m/s). These simulations showed the life-cycle annualized cost of the total energy system (electric plus space heating) might be reduced by nearly 40% simply by adding wind power to the diesel system. An additional 20 to 40% of the wind-diesel cost might be saved by adding hydrogen storage or zinc-air fuel cells to the system. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis of water using intermittent, renewable power provides inexpensive long-term energy storage. Conversion back to electricity with fuel cells can be accomplished with available technology. The advantages of a hydrogen electrolysis/fuel cell system include low life-cycle costs for long term storage, no emissions of concern, quiet operation, high reliability with low maintenance, and flexibility to use hydrogen as a direct fuel (heating, transportation). Disadvantages include high capital costs, relatively low electrical turn-around efficiency, and lack of operating experience in utility settings. Zinc-air fuel cells can lower capital and life-cycle costs compared to hydrogen, with most of the same advantages. Like hydrogen systems, zinc-air technology promises a closed system for long-term storage of energy from intermittent sources. The turn around efficiency is expected to exceed 60%, while use of waste heat can potentially increase overall energy efficiency to over 80%.

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11 p.

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OSTI as DE98057866

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  • POLARTECH `98, Nuuk (Denmark), 8-14 Jun 1998

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  • Other: DE98057866
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--130399
  • Report No.: CONF-9806104--
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 325308
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc680736

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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  • March 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • May 8, 2017, 12:44 p.m.

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Isherwood, W. Energy storage for hybrid remote power systems, article, March 1, 1998; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc680736/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.