Photoluminescence from gas-suspended nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation: A pathway to optimized nanomaterials

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Laser ablation of solids into background gases is a proven cluster-assembly method. It was used to synthesize the first carbon fullerenes in 1985.(1) In this technique, a solid material is vaporized by a high-powered laser pulse to form a partially-ionized plasma containing atoms and small molecules. The hot plasma plume quickly expands to collisionless conditions unless confined by a background gas. In this case, the plume atoms become trapped together and can form clusters as small as a few atoms, or larger clusters of 1--10 nm diameter (25--26,000 atoms for silicon). However, until now very little was known of the ... continued below

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7 p.

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Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.; Duscher, G. & Pennycook, S.J. February 1, 1998.

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Laser ablation of solids into background gases is a proven cluster-assembly method. It was used to synthesize the first carbon fullerenes in 1985.(1) In this technique, a solid material is vaporized by a high-powered laser pulse to form a partially-ionized plasma containing atoms and small molecules. The hot plasma plume quickly expands to collisionless conditions unless confined by a background gas. In this case, the plume atoms become trapped together and can form clusters as small as a few atoms, or larger clusters of 1--10 nm diameter (25--26,000 atoms for silicon). However, until now very little was known of the temporal and spatial scales for nanoparticle formation in background gases, or how the nanoparticles are transported and deposited after their formation. It is often unclear whether nanoparticles found on substrates were grown in the gas phase or from nuclei formed on the substrate surface. Here, the formation and transport of silicon nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes is revealed by a comparison of Rayleigh-scattering and the first photoluminescence measurements of nanoparticles suspended in background gases. Combined with Z-contrast transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) analysis of individual nanoparticles, the authors investigate their fundamental light absorption and emission properties without the influence of neighboring nanoparticles or surrounding solid or liquid hosts. Such understanding is critical for the deposition of optimized films.

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7 p.

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OSTI as DE98004881

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  • 1. NIMC international symposium on photoreaction control and photofunctional materials (PCPM`98), Tsukuba (Japan), 16-18 Mar 1998

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  • Other: DE98004881
  • Report No.: ORNL/CP--97379
  • Report No.: CONF-980366--
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 292897
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc680255

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • February 1, 1998

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Nov. 3, 2016, 7:02 p.m.

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Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.; Duscher, G. & Pennycook, S.J. Photoluminescence from gas-suspended nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation: A pathway to optimized nanomaterials, article, February 1, 1998; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc680255/: accessed December 13, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.