Tensile stress generation by optical breakdown in tissue: Experimental investigations and numerical simulations

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Biological tissue is more susceptible to damage from tensile stress than to compressive stress. Tensile stress may arise through the thermoelastic response of laser-irradiated media. Optical breakdown, however, has to date been exclusively associated with compressive stress. The authors show that this is appropriate for water, but not for tissues for which the elastic-plastic material response needs to be considered. The acoustic transients following optical breakdown in water and cornea were measured with a fast hydrophone and the cavitation bubble dynamics, which is closely linked to the stress wave generation, was documented by flash photography. Breakdown in water produced a ... continued below

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16 p.

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Vogel, A.; Scammon, R.J. & Godwin, R.P. March 1, 1999.

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Description

Biological tissue is more susceptible to damage from tensile stress than to compressive stress. Tensile stress may arise through the thermoelastic response of laser-irradiated media. Optical breakdown, however, has to date been exclusively associated with compressive stress. The authors show that this is appropriate for water, but not for tissues for which the elastic-plastic material response needs to be considered. The acoustic transients following optical breakdown in water and cornea were measured with a fast hydrophone and the cavitation bubble dynamics, which is closely linked to the stress wave generation, was documented by flash photography. Breakdown in water produced a monopolar acoustic signal and a bubble oscillation in which the expansion and collapse phases were symmetric. Breakdown in cornea produced a bipolar acoustic signal coupled with a pronounced shortening of the bubble expansion phase and a considerable prolongation of its collapse phase. The tensile stress wave is related to the abrupt end of the bubble expansion. Numerical simulations using the MESA-2D code were performed assuming elastic-plastic material behavior in a wide range of values for the shear modulus and yield strength. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic-plastic material response is essential to reproduce the experimentally observed bipolar stress waves. The tensile stress evolves during the outward propagation of the acoustic transient and reaches an amplitude of 30--40% of the compressive pulse.

Physical Description

16 p.

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OSTI as DE99002013

Source

  • Photonics West `99: international symposium on biomedical optics (BIOS`99), San Jose, CA (United States), 23-29 Jan 1999

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  • Other: DE99002013
  • Report No.: LA-UR--99-175
  • Report No.: CONF-990110--
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • DOI: 10.2172/350970 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 350970
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc679322

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • March 1, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • March 2, 2016, 12:52 p.m.

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Vogel, A.; Scammon, R.J. & Godwin, R.P. Tensile stress generation by optical breakdown in tissue: Experimental investigations and numerical simulations, report, March 1, 1999; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc679322/: accessed December 14, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.