Laser Tracker III: Sandia National Laboratories` third generation laser tracking system

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At Sandia Labs` Coyote Canyon Test Complex, it became necessary to develop a precision single station solution to provide time space position information (tspi) when tracking airborne test vehicles. Sandia`s first laser tracker came on line in 1968, replacing the fixed camera technique for producing trajectory data. This system shortened data reduction time from weeks to minutes. Laser Tracker 11 began operations in 1982, replacing the original tracker. It incorporated improved optics and electronics, with the addition of a microprocessor-based real-time control (rtc) system within the main servo loop. The rtc added trajectory prediction with the loss of adequate tracking ... continued below

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5 p.

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Patrick, D.L. March 1, 1995.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 41 times , with 4 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Patrick, D.L. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetic and Environmental Test Dept.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

At Sandia Labs` Coyote Canyon Test Complex, it became necessary to develop a precision single station solution to provide time space position information (tspi) when tracking airborne test vehicles. Sandia`s first laser tracker came on line in 1968, replacing the fixed camera technique for producing trajectory data. This system shortened data reduction time from weeks to minutes. Laser Tracker 11 began operations in 1982, replacing the original tracker. It incorporated improved optics and electronics, with the addition of a microprocessor-based real-time control (rtc) system within the main servo loop. The rtc added trajectory prediction with the loss of adequate tracking signal and automatic control of laser beam divergence according to target range. Laser Tracker III, an even more advanced version of the systems, came on line in 1990. Unlike LTII, which is mounted in a trailer and must by moved by a tractor, LTIII is mounted on its own four-wheel drive carrier. This allows the system to be used at even the most remote locations. It also incorporated improved optics and electronics with the addition of absolute ranging, acquisition on the fly, and automatic transition from manual Joystick tracking to laser tracking for aircraft tests. LTIII provides a unique state of the art tracking capability for missile, rocket sled, aircraft, submunition, and parachute testing. Used in conjunction with LTII, the systems together can provide either simultaneous or extended range tracking. Mobility, accuracy, reliability, and cost effectiveness enable these systems to support a variety of testing at Department of Energy and Department of Defense ranges.

Physical Description

5 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95008525

Source

  • SPIE international symposium on aerospace/defense sensing and dual-use photonics, Orlando, FL (United States), 17-21 Apr 1995

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  • Other: DE95008525
  • Report No.: SAND--95-0472C
  • Report No.: CONF-950472--2
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 34416
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc679179

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Creation Date

  • March 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • April 14, 2016, 9:03 p.m.

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Patrick, D.L. Laser Tracker III: Sandia National Laboratories` third generation laser tracking system, article, March 1, 1995; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc679179/: accessed December 13, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.