Dynamical Behavior of Multi-Robot Systems Using Lattice Gas Automata

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Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems. Our group has been studying the collective behavior of autonomous, multi-agent systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi-robotic and multi-agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-ten-sin Lunar Exploration Rover-class vehicles). Overall design methodology ... continued below

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13 p.

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Cameron, S.M.; Robinett, R.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W. & Wagner, J.S. March 11, 1999.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

Recent attention has been given to the deployment of an adaptable sensor array realized by multi-robotic systems. Our group has been studying the collective behavior of autonomous, multi-agent systems and their applications in the area of remote-sensing and emerging threats. To accomplish such tasks, an interdisciplinary research effort at Sandia National Laboratories are conducting tests in the fields of sensor technology, robotics, and multi-robotic and multi-agents architectures. Our goal is to coordinate a constellation of point sensors that optimizes spatial coverage and multivariate signal analysis using unmanned robotic vehicles (e.g., RATLERs, Robotic All-ten-sin Lunar Exploration Rover-class vehicles). Overall design methodology is to evolve complex collective behaviors realized through simple interaction (kinetic) physics and artificial intelligence to enable real-time operational responses to emerging threats. This paper focuses on our recent work understanding the dynamics of many-body systems using the physics-based hydrodynamic model of lattice gas automata. Three design features are investigated. One, for single-speed robots, a hexagonal nearest-neighbor interaction topology is necessary to preserve standard hydrodynamic flow. Two, adaptability, defined by the swarm's deformation rate, can be controlled through the hydrodynamic viscosity term, which, in turn, is defined by the local robotic interaction rules. Three, due to the inherent non-linearity of the dynamical equations describing large ensembles, development of stability criteria ensuring convergence to equilibrium states is developed by scaling information flow rates relative to a swarm's hydrodynamic flow rate. An initial test case simulates a swarm of twenty-five robots that maneuvers past an obstacle while following a moving target. A genetic algorithm optimizes applied nearest-neighbor forces in each of five spatial regions distributed over the simulation domain. Armed with knowledge, the swarm adapts by changing state in order to avoid the obstacle. Simulation results are qualitatively similar to lattice gas.

Physical Description

13 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00004280

Medium: P; Size: 13 pages

Source

  • SPIE 13th Annual International Symposium on Aerospace/Defense Sensing, Simulation, and Controls, Orlando, FL (US), 04/05/1999--04/09/1999

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  • Report No.: SAND99-0598C
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 4280
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc678845

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • March 11, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • April 7, 2017, 1:06 p.m.

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Cameron, S.M.; Robinett, R.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W. & Wagner, J.S. Dynamical Behavior of Multi-Robot Systems Using Lattice Gas Automata, article, March 11, 1999; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678845/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.