Predicting water quality changes from artificial recharge sources to nearby wellfields

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Isotope tracer technologies have proven to be powerful tools for addressing questions related to surface water-ground water interactions. The Alameda County Water District artificially recharges tens of thousands of acre-ft of water annually, delivered from Alameda Creek in order to augment dwindling ground water supplies, and to maintain a barrier to seawater intrusion. The authors are using a suite of isotope tracers to track water movement, source characteristics and accompanying water quality changes from ACWD recharge facilities to nearby wells. The data gathered during the three year project will allow quantification of dilution by ambient basin ground water, subsurface travel ... continued below

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5 p.; Other: FDE: PDF; PL:

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Moran, J.E. January 23, 1998.

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Description

Isotope tracer technologies have proven to be powerful tools for addressing questions related to surface water-ground water interactions. The Alameda County Water District artificially recharges tens of thousands of acre-ft of water annually, delivered from Alameda Creek in order to augment dwindling ground water supplies, and to maintain a barrier to seawater intrusion. The authors are using a suite of isotope tracers to track water movement, source characteristics and accompanying water quality changes from ACWD recharge facilities to nearby wells. The data gathered during the three year project will allow quantification of dilution by ambient basin ground water, subsurface travel times, and several key water quality parameters, including degree of degradation of organic compounds, the fate of trace metals during recharge and subsurface transport, and sources and transport of major ions (salts). Reconnaissance work was carried out on naturally occurring isotopes in order to better understand the hydrogeology of the ground water basin. The basin is dissected by the Hayward Fault, and geologic conditions vary greatly on either side of the fault. Stable isotopes of oxygen, carbon, helium and other noble gases, along with radiocarbon and tritium were measured on water samples from production and monitoring wells. The goal of the reconnaissance work was to age date the water at various depths and distances from the recharge ponds, to examine the chemical evolution of the water with age, and to examine the water for source-related variations in isotope composition. Ground water ages were calculated by the tritium-helium method for three production wells in the Peralta-Tyson wellfield (in the Above Hayward Fault sub-basin), and for a monitoring well positioned between the recharge facilities and production wells, screened at three discreet intervals.

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5 p.; Other: FDE: PDF; PL:

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OSTI as DE98054665

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  • Other Information: PBD: 23 Jan 1998

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  • Other: DE98054665
  • Report No.: UCRL-ID--129651
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/353387 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 353387
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc678844

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  • January 23, 1998

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 17, 2016, 3:32 p.m.

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Moran, J.E. Predicting water quality changes from artificial recharge sources to nearby wellfields, report, January 23, 1998; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678844/: accessed December 11, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.