Chemical and biological systems for regenerating activated carbon contaminated with high explosives

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Description

Activated carbon has been used as a substrate for efficiently removing high explosives (HEs) from aqueous and gaseous waste streams. Carbon that is saturated with HEs, however, constitutes a solid waste and is currently being stored because appropriate technologies for its treatment are not available. Because conventional treatment strategies (i.e., incineration, open burning) are not safe or will not be in compliance with future regulations, new and cost-effective methods are required for the elimination of this solid waste. Furthermore, because the purchase of activated carbon and its disposal after loading with HEs will be expensive, an ideal treatment method would ... continued below

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14 p.

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Knezovich, J.P.; Daniels, J.I.; Stenstrom, M.K. & Heilmann, H.M. December 1, 1994.

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Description

Activated carbon has been used as a substrate for efficiently removing high explosives (HEs) from aqueous and gaseous waste streams. Carbon that is saturated with HEs, however, constitutes a solid waste and is currently being stored because appropriate technologies for its treatment are not available. Because conventional treatment strategies (i.e., incineration, open burning) are not safe or will not be in compliance with future regulations, new and cost-effective methods are required for the elimination of this solid waste. Furthermore, because the purchase of activated carbon and its disposal after loading with HEs will be expensive, an ideal treatment method would result in the regeneration of the carbon thereby permitting its reuse. Coupling chemical and biological treatment systems, such as those described below, will effectively meet these technical requirements. The successful completion of this project will result in the creation of engineered commercial systems that will present safe and efficient methods for reducing the quantities of HE-laden activated carbon wastes that are currently in storage or are generated as a result of demilitarization activities. Biological treatment of hazardous wastes is desirable because the biodegradation process ultimately leads to the mineralization (e.g., conversion to carbon dioxide, nitrogen gas, and water) of parent compounds and has favorable public acceptance. These methods will also be cost- effective because they will not require large expenditures of energy and will permit the reuse of the activated carbon. Accordingly, this technology will have broad applications in the private sector and will be a prime candidate for technology transfer.

Physical Description

14 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95009471

Source

  • 1994 Luxembourg international symposium on the rehabilitation of military sites and demilitarization of explosive ordance, Kirchberg (Luxembourg), 14-18 Nov 1994

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  • Other: DE95009471
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--115974
  • Report No.: CONF-9411155--3
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 42531
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc678566

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  • December 1, 1994

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 16, 2016, 3:14 p.m.

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Knezovich, J.P.; Daniels, J.I.; Stenstrom, M.K. & Heilmann, H.M. Chemical and biological systems for regenerating activated carbon contaminated with high explosives, article, December 1, 1994; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678566/: accessed September 26, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.