Landscape characterization and biodiversity research

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Rapid deforestation often produces landscape-level changes in forest characteristics and structure, including area, distribution, and forest habitat types. Changes in landscape pattern through fragmentation or aggregation of natural habitats can alter patterns of abundance for single species and entire communities. Examples of single-species effects include increased predation along the forest edge, the decline in the number of species with poor dispersal mechanisms, and the spread of exotic species that have deleterious effects (e.g., gypsy moth). A decrease in the size and number of natural habitat patches increases the probability of local extirpation and loss of diversity of native species, whereas ... continued below

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24 p.

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Dale, V.H.; Offerman, H.; Frohn, R. & Gardner, R.H. March 1, 1995.

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  • Dale, V.H. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
  • Offerman, H. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Geography Dept.
  • Frohn, R. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)
  • Gardner, R.H. Appalachian Environmental Lab., Frostburg, MD (United States)

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Description

Rapid deforestation often produces landscape-level changes in forest characteristics and structure, including area, distribution, and forest habitat types. Changes in landscape pattern through fragmentation or aggregation of natural habitats can alter patterns of abundance for single species and entire communities. Examples of single-species effects include increased predation along the forest edge, the decline in the number of species with poor dispersal mechanisms, and the spread of exotic species that have deleterious effects (e.g., gypsy moth). A decrease in the size and number of natural habitat patches increases the probability of local extirpation and loss of diversity of native species, whereas a decline in connectivity between habitat patches can negatively affect species persistence. Thus, there is empirical justification for managing entire landscapes, not just individual habitat types, in order to insure that native plant and animal diversity is maintained. A landscape is defined as an area composed of a mosaic of interacting ecosystems, or patches, with the heterogeneity among the patches significantly affecting biotic and abiotic processes in the landscape. Patches comprising a landscape are usually composed of discrete areas of relatively homogeneous environmental conditions and must be defined in terms of the organisms of interest. A large body of theoretical work in landscape ecology has provided a wealth of methods for quantifying spatial characteristics of landscapes. Recent advances in remote sensing and geographic information systems allow these methods to be applied over large areas. The objectives of this paper are to present a brief overview of common measures of landscape characteristics, to explore the new technology available for their calculation, to provide examples of their application, and to call attention to the need for collection of spatially-explicit field data.

Physical Description

24 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95007399

Source

  • International Union of Forestry and Research Organizations` (IUFRO) symposium on measuring and monitoring biodiversity in tropical and temperate forests, Chiang Mai (Thailand), 28 Aug - 2 Sep 1994

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  • Other: DE95007399
  • Report No.: CONF-9408220--1
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 32569
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc678403

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Creation Date

  • March 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • June 24, 2016, 6:22 p.m.

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Dale, V.H.; Offerman, H.; Frohn, R. & Gardner, R.H. Landscape characterization and biodiversity research, article, March 1, 1995; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678403/: accessed April 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.