Evolution of some Los Alamos flux compression programs

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When we were approached to give a general discussion of some aspects of the Los Alamos flux compression program, we decided to present historical backgrounds of a few topics that have some relevance to programs that we very much In the forefront of activities going on today. Of some thirty abstracts collected at Los Alamos for this conference, ten of them dealt with electromagnetic acceleration of materials, notably the compression of heavy liners, and five dealt with plasma compression. Both of these topics have been under investigation, off and on, from the time a formal flux compression program was organized ... continued below

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13 p.

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Fowler, C.M. & Goforth, J.H. December 31, 1996.

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When we were approached to give a general discussion of some aspects of the Los Alamos flux compression program, we decided to present historical backgrounds of a few topics that have some relevance to programs that we very much In the forefront of activities going on today. Of some thirty abstracts collected at Los Alamos for this conference, ten of them dealt with electromagnetic acceleration of materials, notably the compression of heavy liners, and five dealt with plasma compression. Both of these topics have been under investigation, off and on, from the time a formal flux compression program was organized at Los Alamos. We decided that a short overview of work done In these areas would be of some interest. Some of the work described below has been discussed in Laboratory reports that, while referenced and available, are not readily accessible. For completeness, some previously published, accessible work Is also discussed but much more briefly. Perhaps the most striking thing about the early work In these two areas is how primitive much of it was when compared to the far more sophisticated, related activities of today. Another feature of these programs, actually for most programs, Is their cyclic nature. Their relevance and/or funding seems to come land go. Eventually, many of the older programs come back into favor. Activities Involving the dense plasma focus (DPF), about which some discussions will be given later, furnish a classic example of this kind, coming Into and then out of periods of heightened interest. We devote the next two sections of this paper to a review of our work In magnetic acceleration of solids and of plasma compression. A final section gives a survey of our work In which thin foils are imploded to produce intense quantities of son x-rays. The authors are well aware of much excellent work done elsewhere In all of these topics, but partly because of space limitations, have confined this discussion to work done at Los Alamos.

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13 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE97002336

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  • Megagauss magnetic field generation and related topics, Sarov (Russian Federation), 5-10 Aug 1996

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  • Other: DE97002336
  • Report No.: LA-UR--96-3730
  • Report No.: CONF-9608132--15
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 449131
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc678284

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  • December 31, 1996

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:21 a.m.

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  • Feb. 25, 2016, 4:29 p.m.

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Fowler, C.M. & Goforth, J.H. Evolution of some Los Alamos flux compression programs, article, December 31, 1996; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc678284/: accessed January 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.