A damage mechanics approach to life prediction for a salt structure

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Excavated rooms in natural bedded salt formations are being considered for use as repositories for nuclear waste. It is presumed that deformation of the rooms by creep will lead to loss of structural integrity and affect room life history and seal efficiency. At projected repository temperatures, two possible fracture mechanisms in salt are creep-induced microcracking in triaxial compression and cleavage in tension. Thus, an accurate prediction of room life and seal degradation requires a reliable description of the creep and damage processes. While several constitutive models that treat either creep or fracture in salt are available in the literature, very ... continued below

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6 p.

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Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; DeVries, K.L.; Fossum, A.F. & Munson, D.E. March 1, 1995.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

Excavated rooms in natural bedded salt formations are being considered for use as repositories for nuclear waste. It is presumed that deformation of the rooms by creep will lead to loss of structural integrity and affect room life history and seal efficiency. At projected repository temperatures, two possible fracture mechanisms in salt are creep-induced microcracking in triaxial compression and cleavage in tension. Thus, an accurate prediction of room life and seal degradation requires a reliable description of the creep and damage processes. While several constitutive models that treat either creep or fracture in salt are available in the literature, very few models have considered creep and damage in a coupled manner. Previously, Munson and Dawson formulated a set of creep equations for salt based on the consideration of dislocation mechanisms in the creep process. This set of creep equations has been generalized to include continuum, isotropic damage as a fully coupled variable in the response equation. The extended model has been referred to as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model. A set of material constants for the creep and damage terms was deduced based on test data for both clean and argillaceous salt. In this paper, the use of the MDCF model for establishing the failure criteria and for analyzing the creep response of a salt structure is demonstrated. The paper is divided into three parts. A summary of the MDCF model is presented first, which is followed by an evaluation of the MDCF model against laboratory data. Finally, finite-element calculations of the creep and damage response of a salt structure are presented and compared against in-situ field measurements.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE95007732

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  • International conference on computational engineering science, Mauna Lani, HI (United States), 30 Jul - 3 Aug 1995

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  • Other: DE95007732
  • Report No.: SAND--94-2135C
  • Report No.: CONF-950788--4
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 46573
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc676576

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  • March 1, 1995

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:21 a.m.

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  • April 13, 2016, 1:19 p.m.

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Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; DeVries, K.L.; Fossum, A.F. & Munson, D.E. A damage mechanics approach to life prediction for a salt structure, article, March 1, 1995; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc676576/: accessed December 14, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.