Building protypes of damaged systems from analysis simulations

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Our rapid prototype of damaged systems project seeks to provide a technology for allowing engineers to build demonstration prototypes of damaged products from analysis post-processing data. Most commercial finite element programs do not have a capability to construct deformed geometry at the conclusion of an analysis simulation. It is therefore not presently possible to build prototypes of predicted states of a product as the result of being subjected to simulated adverse environments. Our approach is to reverse engineer a description of a deformed finite element mesh into a stereolithography format for prototyping using a Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) machine. This ... continued below

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9 p.

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Tsai, C.S.; Dolin, R.M. & Hefele, J. December 31, 1996.

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Description

Our rapid prototype of damaged systems project seeks to provide a technology for allowing engineers to build demonstration prototypes of damaged products from analysis post-processing data. Most commercial finite element programs do not have a capability to construct deformed geometry at the conclusion of an analysis simulation. It is therefore not presently possible to build prototypes of predicted states of a product as the result of being subjected to simulated adverse environments. Our approach is to reverse engineer a description of a deformed finite element mesh into a stereolithography format for prototyping using a Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) machine. This stereolithography file can be generated from deformed surface node information as well as from a reconstructed surface defined by inspection data. We are developing software to allow users to represent a part or assembly in a deformed condition. The damaged part can then be manufactured using the SLS process for visualization and assessment purposes. The resulting representation can also be used to create simulated X-rays of a damaged or deformed configuration for comparison with experimental test results or field data. This allows engineers to benchmark their analysis methods and provide increased understanding of analysis results through enhanced visualization. The process of reverse engineering `in-use` or damaged products allows for a more refined inspection and comparison of imperfect parts. It addresses the issue of whether or not a part will still work when subjected to certain environments or scenarios. Answers to this question can be found using our model reconstruction technique that represents an `as- built` engineering model configuration. An additional feature of this reverse engineering process is product benchmarking and closer engineer/manufacturer interactions.

Physical Description

9 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE97002335

Source

  • Photonics East `96: International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) conference and exhibition on photonic sensors and controls for commercial applications, Boston, MA (United States), 19-21 Nov 1996

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  • Other: DE97002335
  • Report No.: LA-UR--96-3727
  • Report No.: CONF-961113--26
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 460774
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc676065

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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Creation Date

  • December 31, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:21 a.m.

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  • May 20, 2016, 2:31 p.m.

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Tsai, C.S.; Dolin, R.M. & Hefele, J. Building protypes of damaged systems from analysis simulations, article, December 31, 1996; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc676065/: accessed August 14, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.