Report on a workshop concerning code validation

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The design of wind turbine components is becoming more critical as turbines become lighter and more dynamically active. Computer codes that will reliably predict turbine dynamic response are, therefore, more necessary than before. However, predicting the dynamic response of very slender rotating structures that operate in turbulent winds is not a simple matter. Even so, codes for this purpose have been developed and tested in North America and in Europe, and it is important to disseminate information on this subject. The purpose of this workshop was to allow those involved in the wind energy industry in the US to assess ... continued below

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167 p.; Other: 164 p./6.6 Mb

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Creator: Unknown. December 1, 1996.

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The design of wind turbine components is becoming more critical as turbines become lighter and more dynamically active. Computer codes that will reliably predict turbine dynamic response are, therefore, more necessary than before. However, predicting the dynamic response of very slender rotating structures that operate in turbulent winds is not a simple matter. Even so, codes for this purpose have been developed and tested in North America and in Europe, and it is important to disseminate information on this subject. The purpose of this workshop was to allow those involved in the wind energy industry in the US to assess the progress invalidation of the codes most commonly used for structural/aero-elastic wind turbine simulation. The theme of the workshop was, ``How do we know it`s right``? This was the question that participants were encouraged to ask themselves throughout the meeting in order to avoid the temptation of presenting information in a less-than-critical atmosphere. Other questions posed at the meeting are: What is the proof that the codes used can truthfully represent the field data? At what steps were the codes tested against known solutions, or against reliable field data? How should the designer or user validate results? What computer resources are needed? How do codes being used in Europe compare with those used in the US? How does the code used affect industry certification? What can be expected in the future?

Physical Description

167 p.; Other: 164 p./6.6 Mb

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OSTI as DE97000085

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  • Code validation or how do we know it`s right conference, Boulder, CO (United States), 8-9 Aug 1996

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  • Other: DE97000085
  • Report No.: NREL/CP--440-21976
  • Report No.: CONF-9608175--Summ.
  • Grant Number: AC36-83CH10093
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 418457
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc676024

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • December 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • March 31, 2016, 4:22 p.m.

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Report on a workshop concerning code validation, article, December 1, 1996; Golden, Colorado. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc676024/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.