Corrosion in Non-Hermetic Microelectronic Devices

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Description

Many types of integrated and discrete microelectronic devices exist in the enduring stockpile. In the past, most of these devices have used conventional ceramic hermetic packaging (CHP) technology. Sometime in the future, plastic encapsulated microelectronic (PEM) devices will almost certainly enter the inventory. In the presence of moisture, several of the aluminum-containing metallization features common to both types of packaging become susceptible to atmospheric corrosion (Figure 1). A breach in hermeticity (e.g., due to a crack in the ceramic body or lid seal) could allow moisture and/or contamination to enter the interior of a CHP device. For PEM components, the ... continued below

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5 pages

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Braithwaite, J. W. & Sorensen, N. R. March 16, 1999.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 11 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

Many types of integrated and discrete microelectronic devices exist in the enduring stockpile. In the past, most of these devices have used conventional ceramic hermetic packaging (CHP) technology. Sometime in the future, plastic encapsulated microelectronic (PEM) devices will almost certainly enter the inventory. In the presence of moisture, several of the aluminum-containing metallization features common to both types of packaging become susceptible to atmospheric corrosion (Figure 1). A breach in hermeticity (e.g., due to a crack in the ceramic body or lid seal) could allow moisture and/or contamination to enter the interior of a CHP device. For PEM components, the epoxy encapsulant material is inherently permeable to moisture. A multi-year project is now underway at Sandia to develop the knowledge base and analytical tools needed to quantitatively predict the effect of corrosion on microelectronic performance and reliability. The issue of corrosion-induced failure surfaced twice during the past year because cracks were found in their ceramic bodies of two different CHP devices: the SA371 1/3712 MOSFET and the SA3935 ASIC (acronym for A Simple Integrated Circuit). Because of our inability to perform a model-based prediction at that time, the decision was made to determine the validity of the corrosion concern for these specific situations by characterizing the expected environment and assessing its relative degree of corrosivity. The results of this study are briefly described in this paper along with some of the advancements made with the predictive model development.

Physical Description

5 pages

Notes

OSTI as DE00004501

Source

  • 22nd Aging, Compatibility and Stockpile Stewardship Conference, Oak Ridge, TN (US), 04/27/1999--04/30/1999

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  • Report No.: SAND99-0622C
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 4501
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc675266

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • March 16, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • July 25, 2015, 2:21 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 11, 2016, 2:07 p.m.

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Braithwaite, J. W. & Sorensen, N. R. Corrosion in Non-Hermetic Microelectronic Devices, article, March 16, 1999; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc675266/: accessed November 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.