{open_quotes}Bubble fusion{close_quotes}: Preliminary estimates of spherical micro-implosions in cavitating liquids

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Liquids irradiated with intense ultrasonic waves can generate small cavities or bubbles. Upon nonlinear expansion to a state of disequilibrium, wherein the externally imposed hydrostatic pressure far exceeds that of entrapped non-condensable gas, these bubbles undergo a rapid and violent collapse. This collapse, if symmetric, can generate high pressures and temperatures through a number of possible mechanisms. The simplest and oldest explanation suggests a focusing of the kinetic energy of all the surrounding liquid onto the collapsing bubble and the subsequent heating of entrapped gases under either adiabatic or isothermal conditions. Although induced by externally imposed millisecond pressure oscillations, these ... continued below

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7 p.

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Krakowski, R.A. February 1, 1995.

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Liquids irradiated with intense ultrasonic waves can generate small cavities or bubbles. Upon nonlinear expansion to a state of disequilibrium, wherein the externally imposed hydrostatic pressure far exceeds that of entrapped non-condensable gas, these bubbles undergo a rapid and violent collapse. This collapse, if symmetric, can generate high pressures and temperatures through a number of possible mechanisms. The simplest and oldest explanation suggests a focusing of the kinetic energy of all the surrounding liquid onto the collapsing bubble and the subsequent heating of entrapped gases under either adiabatic or isothermal conditions. Although induced by externally imposed millisecond pressure oscillations, these collapses can occur on sub-microsecond timescales and are accompanied by picosecond light emissions; this combination of sound and light is called sonoluminescence. Recent explanations of observed high temperatures and picosecond radiation pulses accompanying such collapses are based on the interaction of multiple shock waves that are launched off the inward cavity wall. Other potential explanations invoke dipole emissions induced by intermolecular collisions or the release of Casimir energy when a dielectric hole is filled. Conjectures have been made that the processes responsible for sonoluminescence may be extended to generated conditions where thermonuclear fusion might occur. Such an achievement would extend scientific interest in sonoluminescence out of a purely chemical context to include the study of matter subjected to more extreme conditions. The main goal of this {open_quotes}scoping{close_quotes} study is to understand better conditions where deuterium-tritium fusion might be observed in conjunction with micro-implosions in cavitating liquids; prognoses of fusion application at this point are unintended.

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7 p.

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OSTI as DE95006260

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  • DOE/EPRI workshop on the physics of spherical continuous inertial fusion, Santa Fe, NM (United States), 12-14 Jan 1995

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  • Other: DE95006260
  • Report No.: LA-UR--95-211
  • Report No.: CONF-950170--1
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 32493
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc674977

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  • February 1, 1995

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  • July 25, 2015, 2:20 a.m.

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  • Feb. 25, 2016, 10:10 p.m.

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Krakowski, R.A. {open_quotes}Bubble fusion{close_quotes}: Preliminary estimates of spherical micro-implosions in cavitating liquids, article, February 1, 1995; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc674977/: accessed November 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.