Function of the oxidative burst in hypersensitive disease resistance

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Article on the function of the oxidative burst in hypersensitive disease resistance.

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6 p.

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Tenhaken, Raimund; Levine, Alex; Brisson, Louise F.; Dixon, R. A. & Lamb, Christopher J. May 1, 1995.

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Article on the function of the oxidative burst in hypersensitive disease resistance.

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6 p.

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Abstract: Microbial elicitors or attempted infection with an avirulent pathogen strain causes the rapid production of reactive oxygen intermediates. Recent findings indicate that H2O2 from this oxidative burst plays a central role in the orchestration of the hypersensitive response: (i) as the substrate driving the cross-linking of cell wall structural proteins to slow microbial ingress prior to the deployment of transcription-dependent defenses and to trap pathogens in cells destined to undergo hypersensitive cell death, (ii) as a local threshold trigger of this programmed death in challenged cells, and (iii) as a diffusible signal for the induction in adjacent cells of genes encoding cellular protectants such as glutathione S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase. These findings provide the basis for an integrated model for the orchestration of the localized hypersensitive resistance response to attack by an avirulent pathogen.

This paper was presented at a colloquium entitled "Self-Defense by Plants: Induction and Signalling Pathways," organized by Clarence A. Ryan, Christopher J. Lamb, André T. Jagendorf, and Pappachan E. Kolattukudy, held September 15-17, 1994, by the National Academy of Sciences, in Irvine, CA.

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  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (U.S.), 1995, Washington D.C.: National Academy of Sciences (U.S.), pp. 4158-4163

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  • Publication Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
  • Volume: 92
  • Issue: 10
  • Page Start: 4158
  • Page End: 4163
  • Pages: 6
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • May 1, 1995

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  • July 9, 2015, 6:19 a.m.

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Tenhaken, Raimund; Levine, Alex; Brisson, Louise F.; Dixon, R. A. & Lamb, Christopher J. Function of the oxidative burst in hypersensitive disease resistance, article, May 1, 1995; [Washington, D.C.]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc674065/: accessed August 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.